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565139
bio website slott-softwarearchitect.blogs…
location Norfolk, VA
age 58
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Jan 18 '13 at 17:19

Software Architect, aspiring writer. Programmer for well over 30 years, about 70% of my working life.

Blog: S.Lott-Software Architect.

Books: Building Skills.

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Mar
1
comment Which statically typed languages support intersection types for function return values?
The value of the new type is -- effectively -- the same bytes with a radically new type. Something that cannot be done in Python at all, because Python is more strongly-typed than C++. That is my salient point.
Feb
29
comment Which statically typed languages support intersection types for function return values?
@JamesYoungman: Are you telling me that a C++ cast does not reinterpret the bytes as if they were a new class? If that's not what happens, can you describe what does happen?
Feb
27
comment Functional Programming on the rise?
@JonHarrop: (1) You're the only person who suggested correctness was or was not testable. I don't see it in the answer. (2) I cannot discuss this further because the moderators have deemed me too "aggressive". Your points about correctness are good, but don't seem germane to the answer. Only this protracted discussion. Are there words in the answer you're suggesting be changed? If so, which words and to what do you suggest they be changed?
Feb
27
comment Functional Programming on the rise?
@JonHarrop: I think you're responding to Steve314. I didn't mention type annotations. While static languages have them, they can be inferred.
Feb
27
comment Which statically typed languages support intersection types for function return values?
@JamesYoungman: I guess I was wrong. They seem to reinterpret the object's sequence of bytes as if it's a new type of data, changing the type rules, methods and interpretation of the bytes. That was my understanding. What really happens if that's not what's happening?
Feb
27
comment Functional Programming on the rise?
@JonHarrop: "Python implicitly casts". Not exactly. It creates new objects from old objects. Different thing entirely. Static type checking only confirms one aspect. And that's trivially spoofed through casts and failing to implement the intent of an override (or abstract) method. I feel that these are factual statements. Moderators have disagreed with me. I'm afraid that I cannot discuss this further because I've been labeled as "aggressive".
Feb
26
comment Which statically typed languages support intersection types for function return values?
The type of a Python object cannot (without serious magic) be changed. There is no "cast" operator as there is with Java and C++. That makes each object strongly typed. Variable names and function names have no type binding, but the objects themselves are strongly typed. The key concept here is not the presence of declarations. The key concept is the available of cast operators. Also note that this appears to me to be factual; moderators may dispute that, however.
Feb
25
comment Which statically typed languages support intersection types for function return values?
@JamesYoungman: What? That's true for all languages. All languages I've ever seen have to_string conversions left, right and center. I don't get your comment at all. Can you elaborate?
Feb
25
comment Prepare source code handover plan
@kame: Please update the answer with the definitions. Please do not add yet more comments to the answer. Please update the answer.
Feb
24
comment Prepare source code handover plan
A claim that the code builds is not the same as actually seeing the code get built. Been there. Done that. The documentation can be vague, or confusing or incomplete. It's the old "Trust but Verify" principle. Until you see it, don't believe it.
Feb
24
comment Prepare source code handover plan
I would suggest that these be modified to have the words "You must see them..." e.g., "You must see them build the code" and "You must see them run the unit tests", etc. Evidence is important here.
Feb
24
comment Prepare source code handover plan
Please define "DR", "DEV, ST, UAT, Pre PROD, PROD, DR", and "RACI". Note that some of this is irrelevant for source code (i.e., RACI charts are organizational, not code related at all.)
Feb
24
comment Why don't schools teach about bad code?
There are an infinite number of bad things. Only a few good things. Why waste time on all the bad things that are possible?
Feb
24
comment Designing access to file-based “database”
Already wrote significant parts of it. It may, however, fail to fit your criteria of no SQL-like enforced structure. sourceforge.net/projects/stingrayreader/?source=directory
Feb
24
comment Designing access to file-based “database”
And I said that ORM depends on SQL, which the file system utterly lacks, making it an unfair comparison. I don't think it's logically possible to have anything like that given the nature of the problem. I find it misleading except if you're looking for some SQL-like layer to put tight constraints on the file system. Since you don't want to impose those constraints, the very idea of ORM doesn't seem like a good design principle. It might confuse the possible answers by being part of the question. Are you going to repeat your position again?
Feb
23
comment Designing access to file-based “database”
In that case, the ORM comparison seems off-base. If there is "very little structure" then the ORM comparison seems to be misleading.
Feb
23
comment How practical is it to build your very own social network?
+1: Before thinking about scale, think about users. If no one will use it, scalability doesn't matter. If people are using it, then sell advertising to pay programmers to rewrite it to be scalable.
Feb
23
comment Designing access to file-based “database”
"process is extremely well defined in terms of interface and behavior". Unsurprising. SQL enforces this. Are you asking for the file-system equivalent of SQL?
Feb
23
comment How do I refer to the smallest possible non-zero value?
"It was used to avoid a divide by zero error." That has EPIC FAIL written all over it.
Feb
23
comment Object orientated data structures in database driven applications
" I've never done anything like this before, and I don't know what problems I might come across" You need to stop right now. You need to learn about Object-Relational Mapping. You need to learn a lot. This has already been done, and is a first-class part of C# and .NET. But do not start writing code until you've done every tutorial on C# .NET ORM you can find. You might even want to pay for training on this. It's simple, well-understood, and common. But new to you.