2,655 reputation
1616
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location England, United Kingdom
age
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Jul 17 at 12:16

Apr
24
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Class Design and Separation Of Concerns
Apr
11
awarded  Custodian
Apr
11
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Ruby but not Rails on my Resume
Mar
31
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Why is CPU cache memory so fast?
Mar
14
awarded  Custodian
Mar
14
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Asterisks in Multi-line comments
Mar
14
reviewed Reject suggested edit on outOfMemoryException in android emulator
Feb
5
comment FizzBuzz - really?
I understand and have used recursion in home software but would Never use it in any of my production systems. To explain I write code for small embedded targets where the 2Kbytes (yes 2048 physical bytes of memory, count them all) is a large processor. The risk of a recursive function call causing the stack to overwrite my statically allocated memory is just too great to allow the use of recursion.
Oct
21
awarded  Yearling
Feb
27
awarded  Informed
Feb
26
awarded  Constituent
Feb
25
awarded  Caucus
Oct
21
awarded  Yearling
Sep
5
comment How can I give a basic idea of what I'm working on to a non programmer?
+1 "Explain what you are doing in a way that doesnt relate to code" Exactly right. A non programmer couldn't care about all the finely crafted classes communicating through widget protected global variables and the nest of GOTO statements that you put in to confuse the maintenance group. Explain in terms that relate to their life experience. Anyone can understand "the website is slow and I am making it go faster".
Jul
30
comment Are some NOP codes treated differently than others?
Most times the NOP instruction is used to insert a short delay, usually as a result of some hardware dependency or device errata work around. The performance penalty is the reason for using the NOP.
Jul
17
comment Should you keep a copy of all the code you write?
See this article embeddedgurus.com/stack-overflow/2012/02/… from Nigel Jones who acts as an expert witness in software theft cases.
Jun
1
answered What is the purpose of “re-type your email” field?
May
3
awarded  Great Answer
Apr
17
comment Is it a good practice to use smaller data types for variables to save memory?
@nikie - they might be aligned on a 4 byte boundary on an x86 processor but this is not true in general. MSP430 places char on any byte address and everything else on an even byte address. I think that AVR-32 and ARM Cortex-M are the same.
Apr
17
comment Is it a good practice to use smaller data types for variables to save memory?
When writing for an embedded processor the difference between short, int, long is often going to make a huge difference to whether your application will fit in the available memory. In the embedded world different rules apply. ...And before anyone says that C++ is not used on small processors - my last C++ project had a massive 32K of RAM, before that we had just 2K.