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Feb
25
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
24
awarded  Scholar
Feb
24
accepted How to bill a client for frequently-interrupted time
Feb
24
comment How to bill a client for frequently-interrupted time
At first I didn't think this would do much for me, but I tried one today and I found it was very effective. I'm not sure if it's really the timekeeping aspect, but because it forced me to be acutely aware of what I was officially doing at any given time I do feel that I had a better picture (at least for today). It turns out that the distractions aren't quite as time-consuming as I thought, but it could also be that the timeclock kept me more focused than usual. We'll see as the novelty wears off whether the positive effect continues, but I'm optimistic thus far.
Feb
23
comment How to bill a client for frequently-interrupted time
@MatthewFrederick - Thanks, that's not a horrible idea at all. I've certainly speculated whether this might be the case (cute online self-tests tend to show borderline). Do you feel like medication (or tips) inhibit your creativity in any way - that is, would you intentionally go "off the wagon" for certain activities?
Feb
23
awarded  Critic
Feb
23
comment How to bill a client for frequently-interrupted time
@Matthew I think there are two parallel problems, and you've hit on both. There's the cost of context-switching between projects, and then there's the cost of focus breaks, sometimes involuntary (which I think is a similar gray area to billing travel time - you're not really working, but it's time you spend that's still necessary in order to work)
Feb
23
revised How to bill a client for frequently-interrupted time
Added clarification about distraction types to keep the answers focused on a fair billing policy and not ways to focus or just "stop being a bad person and do it"
Feb
23
comment How to bill a client for frequently-interrupted time
@Steven Let me take a less argumentative tack (and I intend this with genuine curiosity): are you able to maintain that inspired 20% focus throughout an entire 8-hour billing day? Or do you end up billing the same for very productive hours as for fairly non-productive hours? (Or are you in the same boat I am, where you work 12 hours to feel that you've put in a legitimate high-focus 8 hours for your client?)
Feb
23
comment How to bill a client for frequently-interrupted time
This estimation: bill half or 25% is what I do now. Something like TimeSnapper is probably not relevant in my case either - much of the time is spent thinking (or whiteboarding or reading paper), which means whatever window was up on my screen stays up for a long time.
Feb
23
comment How to bill a client for frequently-interrupted time
Different projects are most a fact of life - I don't mean mean I'm off playing sudoku with my time. These distractions happen in ANY office environment, but become a non-issue if compensation is salary or fixed-fee.
Feb
23
comment How to bill a client for frequently-interrupted time
Actually, I'm selling my clients results; nobody buys hours. An hour of time is an invoicing mechanism. I was pretty specific in my question that productivity/focus improvements are an obvious resolution but that is not what the question asked for. A better response might be "bill the client a fixed fee for that result"
Feb
23
awarded  Student
Feb
23
asked How to bill a client for frequently-interrupted time
Feb
22
comment What do you think was a poor design choice in Java?
+1 for Security model. Ugh.
Feb
16
revised What are the best tools to help work with large ant files
edited tags
Feb
15
comment What issues tend to arise when working with HL7 messages?
+1 for suggested value lists
Feb
15
answered How to explain my 5 burnt-out years off to a new employer?
Feb
15
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
14
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