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seen Dec 5 '12 at 8:14

Jul
25
awarded  Yearling
Sep
3
comment Specific reasons for still using Subversion?
There's a good, balanced answer about this over on SO: stackoverflow.com/a/875/9625
Sep
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
3
comment Specific reasons for still using Subversion?
This should not be a discussion of which is the "better" system. It is merely about pointing out the pros and cons of both. The OP can then make an informed decision based on the requirements in his company. Git certainly has many advantages, but it also has a steeper learning curve for developers coming from a non-DVCS. (Sidenote: "Maybe better googling skills are required". I do not feel the sarcastic tone is particularly constructive. As my answer states, VS Git integration certainly exists but it is simply not as mature as the SVN equivalent today)
Sep
3
comment Specific reasons for still using Subversion?
"You will hit the bottleneck somewhere in future where you will have to eventually plan a version control migration..." Sorry, I can't agree this is a good reason to make the move today. I've worked on many projects where this approach leads to making things more complicated than they need to be and the project is cancelled long before it ever gets to take advantage of those future benefits. Sometimes good enough, is good enough. Stick to YAGNI and take what does the job today. There'll be time enough for worrying about migrations later. At least you'll still have a project.
Sep
3
awarded  Teacher
Sep
3
answered Specific reasons for still using Subversion?
Jul
25
comment Are unit tests really that useful?
"unit tests are for catching regressions". No. Automated tests are for catching regressions. Regressions invariably require the same tests to be run many hundreds of times so it is worth the effort to automate them. Unfortunately many of the responses and comments on this question are really dealing with the issue "Are automated tests that helpful?". Unit tests may be a form of automated test but they have a completely different focus. I certainly consider automated tests to be worth their weight in gold, but that shouldn't be used as an argument to justify unit tests (or TDD for that matter).
Jul
25
awarded  Supporter