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visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen May 8 at 15:52

I'm a classical guy with some sense to frontend.

I have a separate opinion on Agile, SCRUM, TDD. I don't think they're that cool.

I'm a big fan of RUP and UML, although nowadays I use this more in UX design than in classical software design as that has largely vanished. I still design my own code before writing

I use dynamic languages like JS, Python and PHP to get my job done. I don't believe that explicit static typing helps you as much as it hurts. When it comes to statically typed languages, my expertise is mostly in Java, albeit haven't used it in production since the Java EE years.


Jul
25
comment Is this Hybrid of Interface / Composition kosher?
OK, let's go back to the basics: what are design patterns? Design patterns are problem-patterns which have a corresponding solution-pattern. (This definition comes from the original APL book, not from the DP one) Patterns are like constellations: it doesn't matter what stars do participate in Ursula Major, it only matters what are their relationships. What is the problem you're facing? How well does the problem (not the solution) match the context / forces of one of your patterns? To what are you trying to expose visibility? Why do you need to wrap them? Monads perhaps?
Jul
25
comment Next step after creating mock-up screens
Yeah, and for first, try not to deal with technology. Templating is a key issue, I understand, and especially nested templating is hard always, but the important thing is to display data and retain state. You can try out nested templating in a side-project to feel confident about it. But applications are not about technology. Applications are about software solutions APPLIED to human problems. Get that first.
Jul
25
answered UML representation of specific factory pattern
Jul
25
awarded  Teacher
Jul
25
awarded  Supporter
Jul
25
answered Next step after creating mock-up screens
Jul
25
answered Is this Hybrid of Interface / Composition kosher?