601 reputation
37
bio website trycatchfinally.net
location Phoenix, AZ
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Apr 22 at 19:59

My name is Ryan McCauley, and I'm a database/reporting manager for a mid-size cable company. I spent a number of years as a .NET developer (mostly of the VB.NET variety), but now largely focus on T-SQL and the reporting with the Microsoft BI stack.

On my own time, I build small apps to help get things done a little better, and have a couple posted at Codeplex:

  • SQL Space Map - if you have some large SQL Server databases and you'd like a visual picture of which tables and indexes are taking up that space, it's the tool for you.
  • SQL Server Contention Monitor - watches as may SQL Servers as you want and alerts you to blocked SPIDs, showing you the block tree (which process is blocking which, an what others are affected). It's still in a pretty alpha-ish phase, but it despite some instability at times, it gets the job done.

Check them out and let me know what feedback you have!


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awarded  Yearling
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31
awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Custodian
Feb
18
reviewed Reviewed Should object oriented programming be the first thing students learn?
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18
awarded  Caucus
Nov
7
comment Forbidding or controlling “Hidden IT…” Who should write and maintain ad-hoc software applications?
@Ominus: What's more likely here is that the company does an equally good job of hiring both types of roles, but then the IT group is burdened with beurocracy, conflicting priorities, and a PM system that doesn't do the job well, stifling innovation rather than nurturing it. The techies in the non-IT jobs, once their skill is noticed, are allowed to actually focus on a task, since only their department head is controlling their time. People doing the actual job have an automatic buy-in on innovation, whereas the IT group doesn't have the same perspective on the needs.
Nov
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awarded  Good Answer
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6
awarded  Mortarboard
Nov
6
comment What's a good book to help non-technical management understand software development?
+1 here. This blog (along with Eric Sink's "Business of Software" (ericsink.com/bos/Business_of_Software.html - though much more technical recently than it used to be) put IT in very clear business terms that non-technical people can digest. In the end, IT has to provide value and is only different in how it accomplishes the goal, not the goal it accomplishes.
Nov
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
6
comment What's a good book to help non-technical management understand software development?
Though I'll concede that it might be too technical, I'd argue that MMM isn't too old at all - when I read it, I was astounded that a book written 30 years ago by a guy who got his experience 40 years ago could still be so spot on and have so much to teach. The fact that I've never gone near any of the technologies he references, but that the book still speaks to people, is a testament to it's timelessness.
Nov
6
comment Forbidding or controlling “Hidden IT…” Who should write and maintain ad-hoc software applications?
@Phil - Agreed. IT is there to help the business run, not to serve any function on its own - it wouldn't exist if it didn't enable the business to do their job better, and everything IT accomplishes should be viewed through the lens of how the business is working better because of their effort. Every process created outside of IT corresponds to a need IT isn't meeting, and banning them reeks more of insecurity. You can't be expected to support processes you didn't develop, and I'd be firm, but refusing to acknowledge that these "rogue" solutions corresponds to real needs is just stubborn.
Nov
6
answered Forbidding or controlling “Hidden IT…” Who should write and maintain ad-hoc software applications?
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awarded  Supporter
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awarded  Autobiographer
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awarded  Teacher