Reputation
Next privilege 125 Rep.
Vote down
Badges
6
Newest
 Teacher
Impact
0 people reached

10h
comment How to stop thinking in terms of code?
@KonradMorawski And there's no need to resort to vote counts to support your argument, I can do the same for the 20 upvotes on Doc Brown's comment. I'd suggest splitting off your second point into a second answer and fleshing it out with your comments as many people are like me probably hesitant to upvote for your first point because they disagree with your second or third.
10h
comment How to stop thinking in terms of code?
@KonradMorawski My tone was harsh because I'm wary of dealing in absolutes. Your first suggestion reads more like "You can't think big picture from behind a keyboard" than the "Change up your process to gain a new perspective" that I assume you were going for. There are plenty of digital tools, whiteboards among them, that offer the latter after all.
15h
comment How to stop thinking in terms of code?
You certainly gave a broad answer. "Unplugging" from the keyboard sounds like Feng Shui for developers while TDD and pseudocode have no real relevance to this question, even if we assume that the OP's manager is talking about implementation rather than communication.
Jul
15
comment What's wrong with comments that explain complex code?
I feel like your final paragraph shouldn't be restricted to personal projects as it can make naturally complex code much more readable. As an example, even simple regex statements can confuse developers that don't normally work with them. Sure, any developer worth his salt should know basic regex or at least be able to decipher it but simply describing the match can avoid a lot of documentation reading.
Jul
13
comment Is the question “What is the using statement” a bad question to ask an interviewee?
@JaredSmith Given that the OP mentions clarifying the question (statement != directive), I assume the OP is the one asking the question and is either sitting in on the main interview or doing a separate skills assessment.
Jun
17
comment Best practice boolean assignment
+1 for infantile code. I've been looking at such code for years, I just lacked the right word to identify it.
May
31
comment Is the use of one-letter variables encouraged?
@BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft Not in all programs no, but I don't see anything wrong with Jorg's suggestions. As Killian put it: "Anything longer cannot possibly make the semantics any more obvious, but takes much longer to read." But this is probably largely a matter of personal preference and style.
May
29
comment Is the use of one-letter variables encouraged?
@BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft I prefer to think of it as efficient programming. Jorg could probably expand on when single letters are appropriate, not just where, but to be honest I imagine most programmers draw the line differently. As for the loop indices, I could argue that any code where the indices don't need names with semantic value is simple enough to justify multi-level nesting over unnecessary extraction. They could also be used in separate loops to avoid possible scoping issues that Nelson brings up‌​.
May
20
awarded  Teacher
May
12
revised What do you call an iterator that returns the current, previous and next siblings of each node of a list?
clarified title: OP wants to know what to name the iterator, not how to call one in code
May
12
suggested approved edit on What do you call an iterator that returns the current, previous and next siblings of each node of a list?
Apr
13
comment Why do many exception messages not contain useful details?
@Telastyn SAP's proprietary ABAP has an exception class construct can contain a message, which is basically an object specifically meant to report program state (success, failure, warning) to the user along with a dynamic (multi-lingual) message. I'll admit I don't know how widespread this kind of thing is, or if it's even encouraged in the languages were it's possible but there's at least one where it's (regrettably) common practice.
Apr
13
comment Why do many exception messages not contain useful details?
I'm aware this has been tagged as C but I should add that your last paragraph does not apply to all languages as some can (rightly or wrongly) rely heavily on exception-based error handling and reporting.
Apr
7
comment Client wants source code, but it contains a lot of shared code I reuse with other projects
All the answers below seem to belong on The Workplace rather than Programmers. OP is asking about how to deal with proprietary shared/utility code when handing over client-specific source code, specifically how to hand over the custom code without exposing the source of the shared code. Whether he should hand any source code over or how that should be legally/financially handled is worth considering but doesn't answer the question.
Mar
20
awarded  Editor
Mar
20
awarded  Organizer
Mar
20
revised When is it a good idea to force garbage collection?
copyediting, added language tag
Mar
20
suggested approved edit on When is it a good idea to force garbage collection?
Mar
1
awarded  Commentator
Mar
1
comment Bad sign if nobody can comprehend one's code?
+1 for the comment block. If you need to write esoteric code for whatever reason go for it, but don't bring hideous-looking code into the codebase without explanation.