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seen Nov 1 '13 at 4:58

Aug
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
4
awarded  Yearling
Jul
21
comment Why not Green Threads?
@delnan Because context switch for native threads costs. Green threads have much less overhead for context switch and interprocess syncs. In addition, the amount of green threads is practically unlimited (it can be hundreds of thousands of them without too much stress for VM process), while amount of native threads is restricted by OS and memory overhead.
Jul
15
awarded  Supporter
Oct
15
answered The C++ web stack, is there one?
Oct
11
comment From Imperative to Functional Programming
@Giorgio tail-recursion is much easier to tranform into loop. Mutual tail-calls are almost impossible to omptimize this way except via whole program analysis and even then it is complicated. Traditional tail-call optimization, as they say, does not transform code. It simply makes tail-call to use or replace existing stack frame and not adding new one. It is easier. It is possible to utilize runtime model without such stack at all too.
Oct
10
comment From Imperative to Functional Programming
@tdammers whatever. I can write mutual recursive functions with tail-calls and it will run fine. This is the only thing that matters
Oct
10
comment From Imperative to Functional Programming
@Giorgio To my knowledge it is limited to tail-recursion only. Two mutual recursive function are not guaranteed to optimize this way.
Oct
2
comment From Imperative to Functional Programming
@tdammers it does. 'stack overflow' sometimes occurring in poorly written code comes from long enough chain of suspended thunks (laziness) and does not have anything in common with stack overflow in deeply recursive C code.
Oct
1
comment How will closures in Java impact the Java Community?
@davidk01 No, I don't. My point is that closures/lambdas work well iff they tied with immutability of catched variables. Otherwise you are in mercy of Tzeentch, and only dedicated worshipers have chances here.
Oct
1
comment How will closures in Java impact the Java Community?
@davidk01 the definition is OK, but when closure has link to mutable variable, its result changes with variable changed. Usually, this is not what one want, but if compiler does not object, the error is almost undetectable.
Sep
30
comment From Imperative to Functional Programming
Hm. Well, I'd say that FPL must provide higher order functions, anonymous functions, partial application and tail-call optimization guarantees. The latter is necessary as many advanced FP techniques won't work without it, and CL lacks it. Scala, being built on top of JVM also has problems with it. Some lisp dialects does guarantee TCO, and may be considered proper FPL from this point of view
Sep
30
comment From Imperative to Functional Programming
@Giorgio Well, you can stick with haskell instead. It can be made fast if needed, though it requires some time to get used to.
Sep
30
comment From Imperative to Functional Programming
@Giorgio fixed. I'm not native speaker.
Sep
30
comment From Imperative to Functional Programming
@Giorgio I think so. Well, it still does have quite a community, so it is not dead yet, but I doubt it has future.
Sep
30
awarded  Editor
Sep
30
revised From Imperative to Functional Programming
deleted 8 characters in body
Sep
30
comment From Imperative to Functional Programming
I never understood why they call Common Lisp functional language.
Sep
30
answered From Imperative to Functional Programming
Sep
30
comment How will closures in Java impact the Java Community?
They do. Proper closures requires immutability to work with without brain explosions.