111 reputation
3
bio website carandraug.no-ip.org/blog
location Oxford, United Kingdom
age 27
visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen Jul 2 at 11:42

My degree is in Biology, but I learned how to program shortly after changing to Linux by poking into the source of the programs I use.

I mostly program in perl for bioinformatics (where I contribute to the BioPerl project) and Octave for image processing, but am capable of reading and hacking in C++, bash, python, and R.

For full disclosure, I am an Octave developer and maintainer of Octave's image package.


Mar
31
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
3
awarded  Teacher
Sep
3
answered Productivity strategies for one developer using many PCs
Sep
3
awarded  Supporter
Aug
26
comment How can I ensure a portion of my project's code remains in all derivative works?
@OwenVersteeg One thing that just occurred to me. Your problem is that the free software community is not very fond of ads. However, I have noticed they have a lot of respect for donate buttons if they are not too annoying. For example, Gnome Do has the "Donate" button on their menus, and if you started typing. It was a very famous application and no one bothered to fork it just to remove that option.
Aug
26
comment How can I ensure a portion of my project's code remains in all derivative works?
@OwenVersteeg a) that's what I meant by limited and that's why I shown a link that says exactly that. b) I don't know the exact word, what I mean is that it licenses can be worked around and why you need a lawyer. c) I don't know what code is since you didn't show it, but with the license you wrote, I'm sure it can be worked around. Anyway, please think twice about doing that. It's not in tune with the philosophy behind free (as in freedom) software. You get paid for support, distribution, write new features when you are asked, whatever. Not a constant source of income.
Aug
25
comment How can I ensure a portion of my project's code remains in all derivative works?
I'll highly advise against modifying a license. At least on GPL, you are limited how you can [change it] (gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/gpl-2.0-faq.html#ModifyGPL). Modifying an existing license is the best way to get it trashed. This license is easy to "fool". Code can be modified to ignore exactly those sections. A deployment script can be done that skip those lines. Plus, your licenses will make sure your code never appears on the repositories of many Linux distributions. Finally, if this is a website, do not use GPL, you should AGPL instead.