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Jun
11
reviewed Close Is there a pattern to assist with working around or fixing violations of the Liskov Substitution Principle?
Jun
11
reviewed Close If I #include a file, do I need to have a valid path to any headers #included in the included file
Jun
11
reviewed Close Who is responsible to challenge a product owner?
Jun
11
reviewed Close What's a good question to measure the candidate's capacity to abstract?
Jun
11
reviewed Close Recursion, iteration, and …?
Jun
11
reviewed Close Find a line that is closest to scattered points
Jun
11
reviewed Close Parameters are passed by value, but editing them will edit the actual object (like passed by reference)?
Jun
11
reviewed Close what is a good way to show mysql experience?
Jun
11
reviewed Close Company wants thoughts about their site during interview
Jun
11
reviewed Close Symbian Test Questions
Jun
11
reviewed Close Why would a program use a closure?
Jun
11
reviewed Close Event Driven Programming?
Jun
11
reviewed Close CGI Scripts and Python / Ruby
Jun
11
reviewed Close Should I commit regularly in new projects?
Jun
11
reviewed Close Brain picking during job interview
Jun
9
comment Why exactly is Git's pull and push approach better than Clearcase's locking and hijacking approach?
@gbjbaanb - How it implements the function is irrelevant. The basic question is whether to lock files that are being worked on or merge after editing. Clearcase isn't a bad implementation of the locking paradigm, but it's still taking the locking approach.
Jun
9
comment Why exactly is Git's pull and push approach better than Clearcase's locking and hijacking approach?
Note that the 'locking vs. merging' debate goes back at least as far as the introduction of CVS, and you might be able to find other discussions on the subject if you look around.
Jun
9
comment Why exactly is Git's pull and push approach better than Clearcase's locking and hijacking approach?
You're running into the very old 'locking vs. merging' debate. The advantage of 'locking' is that you can know no one else is going to mess with stuff you are changing. The disadvantage is that everyone else is hosed while you are working. And if you take a long time to do something, everyone else is stuck for that whole period. With 'merging', you hold up no one but yourself - everyone else is free to get on with their work and you'll merge when you're good and ready.
Apr
7
comment Has pre-increment operators become that common?
@robertbristow-johnson - When you pass by reference you do avoid the copy. The point here is that in the postincrement case you can't pass by reference because you need to return a different state than the one the object will be in once the increment happens.
Apr
7
comment Has pre-increment operators become that common?
@robertbristow-johnson - When you return from a postincrement operation you CAN NOT return a reference, you return a completely new object, which is a copy of the state of the original object BEFORE the increment operation. That copy may be expensive, and returning an object may itself be expensive.