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Dec
31
comment Am I copy/paste programmer?
OT, but... w3schools is often awful - take what you find there, code or info, with a grain of salt. Actually, do this for code you find anywhere - even Stack Overflow. Just because it appears to work doesn't mean there aren't bodies in the basement...
Dec
30
comment Writing programs without graphical IDE
@Matt: one program per task... Write code in an editor, compile it using a compiler, debug it using a debugger, take a break and play snake.
Dec
27
comment How are head first books?
Oh, come on - they're worth it just for the cover art...
Dec
27
comment How have you found, refined and maintained your coding style?
Good god, man... MSDN? I weep for your peers...
Dec
27
comment Is there any reason to use “plain old data” classes?
@Muad'Dib: technically, it is about programmers. Your compiler doesn't care if you use plain old data structures. Your CPU probably enjoys it (in the "I love the smell of data fresh from the cache" sort of way). It's people who get hung up on "does this make my methodology less pure?" questions.
Dec
23
comment What should be the maximum length of a function?
Regarding the 197-method class... This seems to be a common mistake for inexperienced OOP coders; rather than splitting the logic into separate classes based on logical divisions, they treat each class as its own little program (with fields as globals and anything auxiliary logic implemented in private methods).
Dec
23
comment What should be the maximum length of a function?
The whole philosophy of FORTH was designed to encourage this... You were intended to design your own vocabulary, relentlessly breaking up your program into smaller and smaller pieces, ending up with less of a script and more of a dictionary. Length-limits alone don't do it - you'll see a routine split into arbitrary pieces just to satisfy some coding standard. I think you're absolutely correct in suspecting that programmers are simply "not taught to modularize things"; this should have been one of the big wins of OOP, but for various reasons it's often de-emphasized as a goal unto itself.
Dec
22
comment Is anything in programming truly evil?
Fascinating mix of humor and humorless here... Also, Hitler loved using goto.
Dec
22
comment Do you check in bin or debug folders (and dlls) into your TFS?
If you're interested in keeping debug symbols, you're better off setting up a symbol server. If you do it right (with source indexing), debugging a minidump will first pull the symbols from your symbol server and then the relevant source from your source control... If you just check in and tag each build, you'll have to do this manually.
Dec
22
comment How did JavaScript become popular?
Sorry, deleted my comment before you responded - it was meant as sarcasm anyway, and therefore not particularly helpful. I should say that, while certainly helpful in getting existing programmers to "dip their toes in the water", a C-like syntax is hardly a guarantee of success. Consider Objective-C: more than a decade in relative obscurity, then Apple buys NeXT and makes it their foundation for all sorts of fun little gadgets...
Dec
21
comment How would somebody uphold a license on “illegal” code?
yeah, I've seen a number of reports... You really gotta wonder about some people.
Dec
21
comment How would somebody uphold a license on “illegal” code?
Analogy: Stealing weed is illegal. But calling the cops when someone steals your weed is still stupid.
Dec
20
comment Is macros support in a programming language considered harmful?
See also: programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/937/…
Dec
20
comment Is there still a need for writing SQL?
@rsenna: yes, caching tends to be very beneficial for interactive software, as users tend to revisit the same information repeatedly. It's easy to forget about "headless" software, as by definition the software we interact with does have UIs... but it's there, doing its thing behind the scenes.
Dec
19
comment What do you do when you have to work on a project using a language that you hate?
You grit your teeth, do your job, and find a way to vent
Dec
19
comment What default features is Windows missing that are required for programmers?
@Ygrec: yes. If, as jbinto guesses, you mean virtual desktops, then I'm not sure how that rates as an essential programmer tool. I find them very useful for tasks like image editing, but for programming just having multiple consoles open at once is enough - and both OSs support that (albeit with a rather... sad difference in the available shells).
Dec
18
comment What default features is Windows missing that are required for programmers?
Multiple workspaces? You mean... sub-directories?
Dec
18
comment Does anyone else feel that iterator syntax sugar is a must have in a modern language?
@Chaos: consider the use of iterators in C++'s STL: no direct syntax support (prior to 0x), but fantastically useful because so many generic algorithms supported them. You implement your own iterator according to the pattern, and suddenly find the rest of your work done for you... (well, to a point)
Dec
17
comment Is there still a need for writing SQL?
@rsenna: the easiest example is batch processing: a program that never (for a given definition of eternity) touches the same data twice has no need to cache already-processed data, and merely wastes the memory and CPU involved in constructing and managing such a cache.
Dec
17
comment Is there still a need for writing SQL?
@rsenna: if you've never worked on an application where caching data is pointless, then of course you'll have difficulty understanding why it might not be desirable. As for re-inventing the wheel, that's my point: if you're effectively creating your own, custom ORM then you might as well just use one ready-made... But if you're NOT, then that may be a sign you don't really need one.