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bio website shog9.com
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Community Coordinator for Stack Exchange, Inc.

If necessary, contact me via email to stackexchange.com: shog@...

For by thy words thou shalt be justified, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned.


Dec
19
comment What default features is Windows missing that are required for programmers?
@Ygrec: yes. If, as jbinto guesses, you mean virtual desktops, then I'm not sure how that rates as an essential programmer tool. I find them very useful for tasks like image editing, but for programming just having multiple consoles open at once is enough - and both OSs support that (albeit with a rather... sad difference in the available shells).
Dec
18
comment What default features is Windows missing that are required for programmers?
Multiple workspaces? You mean... sub-directories?
Dec
18
comment Does anyone else feel that iterator syntax sugar is a must have in a modern language?
@Chaos: consider the use of iterators in C++'s STL: no direct syntax support (prior to 0x), but fantastically useful because so many generic algorithms supported them. You implement your own iterator according to the pattern, and suddenly find the rest of your work done for you... (well, to a point)
Dec
17
comment Is there still a need for writing SQL?
@rsenna: the easiest example is batch processing: a program that never (for a given definition of eternity) touches the same data twice has no need to cache already-processed data, and merely wastes the memory and CPU involved in constructing and managing such a cache.
Dec
17
comment Is there still a need for writing SQL?
@rsenna: if you've never worked on an application where caching data is pointless, then of course you'll have difficulty understanding why it might not be desirable. As for re-inventing the wheel, that's my point: if you're effectively creating your own, custom ORM then you might as well just use one ready-made... But if you're NOT, then that may be a sign you don't really need one.
Dec
17
comment Is there still a need for writing SQL?
@rsenna: If you need these and don't use an ORM, then you'll end up implementing them in your DAL. OTOH, if you haven't implemented / don't plan to implement them in your DAL, you probably won't find an ORM compelling for these reasons. Caching in particular can be one of those things that you'll end up having to disable in situations where it doesn't help / actively hurts performance...
Dec
15
comment Is there still a need for writing SQL?
@SnOrfus (in reply to your first comment): it doesn't really matter - if the choice is doing a good job with a tool you know or doing a lousy job with a tool you don't, that's still an argument in favor of using the tool you know; the N+1 problem mentioned elsewhere is an excellent example of how a naive ORM user can end up with problems that would never even occur to a reasonably proficient SQL user. And even long-term, it may only make sense to become a proficient ORM user if you're writing the sort of software that actually stands to benefit from it...
Oct
17
comment What syntax element do you hate most in a programming language you use frequently?
@TimGoodman: I'm not complaining about goto. It's useful, sometimes... And as you note, it's the responsibility of the programmer to avoid it when a cleaner solution exists. But goto in C# switch statements is largely orthogonal to fall-through: you can use goto in C to do the same thing, if you desire. I suggest that the bigger mistake is cramming so much code into casees that fall-through isn't immediately obvious, regardless of whether implicit or explicit.
Oct
13
comment GPL in the workplace?
@Ryan: right. Well, you aren't required to give it to your users. Anyone who gets the compiled code still gets the source.
Oct
13
comment GPL in the workplace?
It all depends on what you mean by "proprietary code". If you mean, "code that you own" then this makes no sense - GPL can't take away your copyright, so unless you assign it to the FSF of your own volition you still own the code that you write. OTOH, if you mean, "code you wish to distribute under a license incompatible with GPL" then you are correct - just as you were able to obtain and use the source you're building on, you are obligated to grant your users this right to your source. Again, it's about distribution - no one who cannot obtain your program has rights to your code.
Oct
13
comment GPL in the workplace?
@Pierre: correct, in the sense that you can't get out of providing source to your users by sticking to server apps.
Oct
4
comment Boss Asking To Work Overtime But Under the Radar
Good choice of a name... ;-)
Oct
3
comment What are the advantages and disadvantages to using your real name online?
"Just stupid people asking them" - everyone else in the class.
Oct
1
comment What's the history of the non-official pronunciation of SQL?
@Joel: an acronym is a word made up of parts of other words. It's effectively a memorization aid. However, SQL isn't a word. It's just three consonants. If you add a few other letters, you can spell "ESQUEL" (a little town in Argentina) or "SEQUEL" (a follow-up or continuation, also the acronymous name of a precursor to SQL - see Peter's answer). But SQL is not itself an acronym.
Sep
30
comment What's the history of the non-official pronunciation of SQL?
@Rook: who the hell pronounces USA "ooohsah"? Or UK "uck"? We don't spell out "India" because that's actually a word... [Edit: oh, I see, you weren't implying that folks try to pronounce those initializations, merely that folks pronounce things differently depending on where they're from. Fair enough. But still, most initializations are spoken as such. ]
Sep
30
comment What's the history of the non-official pronunciation of SQL?
@Peter: funny, I was just reminiscing about Happy Joe's last night. The one in Onalaska though. It used to be better.
Sep
30
comment What's the history of the non-official pronunciation of SQL?
@Joel: I don't mind acronyms, but SQL isn't an acronym - it's an initialization that folks try to pronounce by making up the missing letters. If you want to argue that the long-defunct language SEQUEL should be pronounced the same as the word "sequel", you stand on much firmer ground...
Sep
30
comment What's the history of the non-official pronunciation of SQL?
It matters because hearing "sequel" is like fingernails on a blackboard for some of us... And so we grow out our nails and carry small slates to enable reciprocity.
Sep
29
comment Any experience with “beginner's mind” in pair programming?
See also: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/22795/…
Sep
29
comment Should curly braces appear on their own line?
@leeand00: oh yes. Doesn't matter how big your monitor is, it can't beat crawling over a conference-room floor covered in taped-together printouts with a Sharpie.