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bio website shog9.com
location Colorado
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visits member for 3 years, 7 months
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Community Coordinator for Stack Exchange, Inc.

If necessary, contact me via email to stackexchange.com: shog@...

For by thy words thou shalt be justified, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned.


Sep
29
comment Any experience with “beginner's mind” in pair programming?
See also: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/22795/…
Sep
29
comment Should curly braces appear on their own line?
@leeand00: oh yes. Doesn't matter how big your monitor is, it can't beat crawling over a conference-room floor covered in taped-together printouts with a Sharpie.
Sep
27
comment What are your programming idiosyncrasies?
Empty-line whitespace is worse... Highlighting an apparently empty line to see it completely filled with spaces gives me the creeps - if I scroll, what will I find at the end?
Sep
27
comment Should curly braces appear on their own line?
@leeand00: some of us still print out complex / unfamiliar code in order to study / annotate it. A good pretty-printer mitigates most of the problems though.
Sep
26
comment int* i; or int *i; or int * i;
int*i; - whitespace doesn't grow on trees, you know...
Sep
24
comment Are programmers who read programming-related books still rare?
In response to your edit: Yowza!
Sep
20
comment Is the abundance of frameworks dumbing down programmers?
@Gratzy: well, sure. The more people use a tool, the more bitch about it. When computers were huge, expensive and rare, only a handful of people in the world could complain about how hard they were to use - now everyone does. Similarly, frameworks don't have to make programmers any dumber - they just happen to attract lots and lots of dumb programmers.
Sep
18
comment What are non-programming mistakes that a programmer should avoid?
Beards are great for hiding drool. Just sayin'...
Sep
18
comment What are non-programming mistakes that a programmer should avoid?
Fantastic advice. If only I'd heard this years before...
Sep
18
comment What syntax element do you hate most in a programming language you use frequently?
@Tirawi: I think what you're arguing for is explicit fall-through vs. implicit fall-through. However, that's not a fair description of goto in C#'s switch: you can jump backwards, skip over cases, etc... In short, it's a slightly-constrained form of the goto familiar to users of many other languages - so if you wanted to do the same in C, you could... Of course, if you want to be explicit, there are plenty of other ways to do so: code in function calls instead of case clauses, jump tables, polymorphism... So my first thought is that perhaps you shouldn't be using switch at all...
Sep
18
comment Do dynamic typed languages deserve all the criticism?
@Billy: I think this is common. I was down on dynamic typing for years because of my experience with VB - when eventually I realized that this terrible, schizophrenic implementation of dynamic typing wasn't typical, my opinion changed dramatically.
Sep
18
comment Why do people still say Java is slow?
Indeed, a common side-effect of many JIT compilers is that programs - and individual code paths within those programs - are rather sluggish the first time through. Which is bad news for interactive software with lots of different code paths, and especially in little one-pass utility programs.
Sep
18
comment Why aren't macros included in most modern programming languages?
@Jeffrey: and let's not forget, plenty of 3rd-party code generators. On second thought, let's forget those.
Sep
18
comment What syntax element do you hate most in a programming language you use frequently?
up-voting this, not because I particularly like semicolons, but because I really hate the way VB encourages really long lines by making linebreaks so inconvenient.
Sep
18
comment What syntax element do you hate most in a programming language you use frequently?
Yes, goto is waaay better than fall-through. Though both pale in comparison to the shear awesomeness of longjmp()...
Sep
17
comment What are the key differences between software engineers and programmers?
According to engineers: a vast array of knowledge and skills ranging from project management to hardware design. According to programmers: nothing. Gratuitous (and possibly out-dated) Dijkstra quote: 'If you carefully read its literature and analyze what its devotees actually do, you will discover that software engineering has accepted as its charter, “How to program if you cannot.”' See also: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/64407/…
Sep
16
comment Which tips helped you learn touch-typing?
@PSU: This sort of repetition is important simply to get you used to positioning your hands and hitting the keys (vs. hitting two at once, etc.) And for the old manual typewriters, it had the added bonus of strengthening your fingers... But yeah, once you have that down, it's important that you move on to real words.
Sep
16
comment Which tips helped you learn touch-typing?
Incidentally, if you get your hands on an old Model M (or equiv), the labelled key caps can be removed, leaving you with this (but with the added bonus that once you've mastered touch-typing, you can put the caps on the wrong keys, and mess with less skilled visitors...)
Sep
15
comment Does off-shore resourcing work?
@Jeff: that's actually my biggest complaint about off-shoring - it's harder to get rid of some executive's pet project (huge contract with huge outsourcing firm) than it is to get rid of a bad employee. Of course, it doesn't help when you can't interview the team you'll be sending work to.
Sep
15
comment When is it right to edit the code written by a co-worker?
@John: it's irrelevant in most common (whitespace-agnostic) languages. But in something like Python it could change the behavior of the program: in that case, you'd call it based on whether or not the behavior changed for the better... Note that if your diff tools can't be instructed to ignore whitespace, it could be considered rude even for whitespace-agnostic languages (but then you should probably invest in better tools). And if the change consists of nothing but indentation changes, I'd classify that as "busywork"...