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Sep
18
comment What syntax element do you hate most in a programming language you use frequently?
@Tirawi: I think what you're arguing for is explicit fall-through vs. implicit fall-through. However, that's not a fair description of goto in C#'s switch: you can jump backwards, skip over cases, etc... In short, it's a slightly-constrained form of the goto familiar to users of many other languages - so if you wanted to do the same in C, you could... Of course, if you want to be explicit, there are plenty of other ways to do so: code in function calls instead of case clauses, jump tables, polymorphism... So my first thought is that perhaps you shouldn't be using switch at all...
Sep
18
comment Do dynamic typed languages deserve all the criticism?
@Billy: I think this is common. I was down on dynamic typing for years because of my experience with VB - when eventually I realized that this terrible, schizophrenic implementation of dynamic typing wasn't typical, my opinion changed dramatically.
Sep
18
comment Why do people still say Java is slow?
Indeed, a common side-effect of many JIT compilers is that programs - and individual code paths within those programs - are rather sluggish the first time through. Which is bad news for interactive software with lots of different code paths, and especially in little one-pass utility programs.
Sep
18
comment Why aren't macros included in most modern programming languages?
@Jeffrey: and let's not forget, plenty of 3rd-party code generators. On second thought, let's forget those.
Sep
18
comment What syntax element do you hate most in a programming language you use frequently?
up-voting this, not because I particularly like semicolons, but because I really hate the way VB encourages really long lines by making linebreaks so inconvenient.
Sep
18
comment What syntax element do you hate most in a programming language you use frequently?
Yes, goto is waaay better than fall-through. Though both pale in comparison to the shear awesomeness of longjmp()...
Sep
17
comment What are the key differences between software engineers and programmers?
According to engineers: a vast array of knowledge and skills ranging from project management to hardware design. According to programmers: nothing. Gratuitous (and possibly out-dated) Dijkstra quote: 'If you carefully read its literature and analyze what its devotees actually do, you will discover that software engineering has accepted as its charter, “How to program if you cannot.”' See also: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/64407/…
Sep
15
comment When is it right to edit the code written by a co-worker?
@John: it's irrelevant in most common (whitespace-agnostic) languages. But in something like Python it could change the behavior of the program: in that case, you'd call it based on whether or not the behavior changed for the better... Note that if your diff tools can't be instructed to ignore whitespace, it could be considered rude even for whitespace-agnostic languages (but then you should probably invest in better tools). And if the change consists of nothing but indentation changes, I'd classify that as "busywork"...
Sep
15
comment What can slow a developer down?
@Wizard: just buy a jar of maraschino cherries and add some of the syrup to your drink. Now you can make it as strong as you like... (same trick for vanilla: real vanilla coke is far superior to the pre-mixed stuff)
Sep
15
comment When is it right to edit the code written by a co-worker?
@Chinmay: assuming that fixing the bug actually improves the functionality of the program. A "bug fix" that amounts to a work-around for a bug in the editor's own code, or fixes one bug by introducing new ones indicates, at best, an inability to understand the code being edited: it may be a sign that additional documentation is needed, or merely that the editor needs to spend more time reading before attempting to write...
Sep
13
comment Which language features are considered harmful?
POKE was awesome.
Sep
13
comment Which language features are considered harmful?
Namespacing is one of the things that makes typedefs and templates immediately more friendly.
Sep
13
comment Which language features are considered harmful?
This has gotta be one of my favorite parts of switch... Without fallthrough, there are far more flexible ways of accomplishing the same thing.
Sep
12
comment Should curly braces appear on their own line?
@Roland: that reminds me of those folks who write out expressions with parentheses around (every) (single) (sub-expression)...
Sep
12
comment Should curly braces appear on their own line?
I wish I knew where that little bit of wisdom originated. Because writing your code for people who won't bother to read it is about as pointless as you can get...
Sep
11
comment How often do you use Formal UML?
@Evan: the problem ends up being that the amount of detail necessary for a model accurate enough to actually generate the system causes it to approach the complexity of the system itself - rendering it impractical. Of course there are always people, like your astronauts, who would rather live in their simulacrum than in the world it represents.
Sep
9
comment How can I compensate for having gone to a JavaSchool?
Read.
Sep
7
comment As a software engineer, who should I be following on Twitter?
@Thomas: good point - what we really need is software that can take the recommendations here, pull the associated twitter feeds, follow the links contained therein, and aggregate the contents.
Sep
7
comment Do you prefer conciseness or readability in your code?
@Chris: if it wasn't subjective, it'd be on Stack Overflow...
Sep
6
comment Do you prefer conciseness or readability in your code?
@Damovisa: exactly - the goal of code is communication, and there's no general reason why this shouldn't be done as concisely as possible (but no more).