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Interested in survivable networking, open distributed programming, object capability security, reactive programming, temporal semantics.


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revised Has “Not everyone can be a programmer” been studied?
link to new essay related to prior answer
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comment Has “Not everyone can be a programmer” been studied?
@mctylr - I cannot generalize to developmental disabilities. However, the line between user interface and programming is quite blurry in the realm of live coding. Anyone who can communicate through reading and writing - i.e. who can learn and use ad-hoc symbolic abstractions - is capable of learning to program. Regarding formal education: Alan Kay has introduced very young children to programming successfully, and repeatably. Squeak, Logo, ToonTalk, Alice, Basic, and other PLs have all been used successfully by children. Estonia will soon be teaching 6 year olds - not much education.
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comment Has “Not everyone can be a programmer” been studied?
@Izkata Review the author's page, linked by Jeff Atwood in his reply to Serg. The conclusions reached in the 2006 paper did not hold in later tests.
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comment Has “Not everyone can be a programmer” been studied?
@YannisRizos - It is not clear to me what you want me to remove from my answer. But I can only caution that most studies of this subject involve people finding the answers they want to see, rather than answers the evidence can reach.
Sep
5
comment Has “Not everyone can be a programmer” been studied?
@Izkata - The paper Serg linked is of dubious scientific value; similar results would be achieved from any poorly taught class: people who already understood the subject did well. And regarding your example question: more common were questions that assumed imperative semantics, which are certainly not intuitive. Could you even answer your own question if you could not assume the absence of concurrency?
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comment Has “Not everyone can be a programmer” been studied?
@jfrankcarr - Any skill, at a professional or competitive level, will leave many practitioners behind. Most people cannot speak or write even natural language professionally.
Sep
4
answered Has “Not everyone can be a programmer” been studied?