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visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Jun 17 at 18:53

Jun
10
comment What is the origin of the negative term “Legacy Code”
While this might be true, it would be better if you were to edit the answer to cite specific references supporting the claims made in this answer. Are there any such references that you can cite?
Jun
10
comment What is the origin of the negative term “Legacy Code”
@stevebot Of course I'm not -- I'm just suggesting how to phrase the question in order to get the answer to what you yourself say you are looking for the answer to, rather than something else. Clear, specific questions with a minimum of superfluous material helps everyone.
Jun
9
comment What is the origin of the negative term “Legacy Code”
@stevebot If you want to find the origin of the term, you should ask for that without presupposing a connotation.
May
13
awarded  Nice Answer
May
13
comment Is it correct to call the assignment symbol an “operator” when it is actually a statement?
@rick Anyway, I have edited my answer to try to make it more clear. Does it make more sense now?
May
13
revised Is it correct to call the assignment symbol an “operator” when it is actually a statement?
added 87 characters in body
May
13
comment Is it correct to call the assignment symbol an “operator” when it is actually a statement?
The operator itself forms a part of the statement, just as the binary + (the addition) operator forms one part of a statement.
May
13
comment Is it correct to call the assignment symbol an “operator” when it is actually a statement?
@rick The difference is whether or not the complete assignment statement forms a valid rvalue. The people who made Ada decided that the assignment statement is not a rvalue (which makes x := (y := z); invalid, because the value side of an assignment by definition must be a rvalue), while the people who designed C decided that an assignment statement is a valid rvalue (making x = (y = z); valid). I've re-read your question and honestly don't see how this (most of which is already in the answer) plus the topmost part of the answer does not answer your question.
May
13
answered Is it correct to call the assignment symbol an “operator” when it is actually a statement?
May
13
revised Should you throw an exception if a method's input values are out of range?
added 1702 characters in body
May
13
comment Should you throw an exception if a method's input values are out of range?
@joeytwiddle If we are talking about "advanced" types already, isn't that exactly the kind of work mutator functions are supposed to perform?
May
13
comment Should you throw an exception if a method's input values are out of range?
@DougM I can think of only one that does: Java. And possibly Ada.
May
13
revised Should you throw an exception if a method's input values are out of range?
added 72 characters in body
May
13
answered Should you throw an exception if a method's input values are out of range?
Apr
11
comment How to inherit from two parent classes
C++ also supports shooting yourself in the foot. Twice. With a RPG.
Apr
11
comment How to inherit from two parent classes
Remember that inheritance should describe "is a" relationships. Here's a suggestion: look up composition instead. It will almost certainly suit your needs better.
Apr
11
revised How to inherit from two parent classes
Add 'multiple-inheritance' tag
Apr
11
suggested suggested edit on How to inherit from two parent classes
Apr
11
comment Is Java easy decompilation a factor worth considering
.NET is just about worse, yet tons of companies develop desktop software using .NET.
Apr
11
comment What made BASIC profitable?
I believe with your third paragraph you're thinking of en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altair_BASIC#Origin_and_development