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 Yearling
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Feb
11
comment Why did BASIC use line numbers?
The fact that the system is an 8-bit architecture isn't really the limiting factor, though. Now, the fact that said system might have only a few kilobytes of RAM and a handful of kilobytes of ROM, and possibly even no permanent storage (if your casette tape recorder broke)...
Jan
14
comment Is it effective to review code in language I don't know?
Also related: How can I make being code reviewed by someone who doesn't know the language easier?
Nov
25
comment Would UTF-8 be able to support the inclusion of a vast alien language with millions of new characters?
What's to say the bees aren't said alien overlords?
Oct
29
comment Why is the minus sign, '-', generally not overloaded in the same way as the plus sign?
Hence, we have that ('ABABABABA' + 'B') - 'B' is nowhere near the same as the starting value 'ABABABABA'.
Oct
25
awarded  Yearling
Oct
1
comment Should I stop using the term C/C++?
The last bullet point would be better expressed as "programmer with experience in C and C++" if that's what you are actually looking for. A job advert titled "programmer" which under the experience needed heading lists "C and C++" or "C or C++" is not significantly different from one titled "programmer" and lists "C/C++" as a necessary qualification, but it is much more exact. The type of person you are looking for for such a job might very well really appreciate that exactness of expression.
Sep
28
comment Why is .NET VM based?
@MichaelT The NT 4 installation CD had binaries for a number of architectures. I believe Alpha was one of them.
Sep
28
comment Why is .NET VM based?
It's interesting to note that even in the 1960s, the Apollo guidance computer used a somewhat similar scheme. See here on NASA's History site, the section titled "Programming the AGC". I recall seeing something more thorough on Wikipedia but can't seem to find it.
Sep
28
comment Why is .NET VM based?
An interesting aside: initial Windows NT development specifically targetted non-IA-32 platforms.
Sep
25
comment Why are the sizes of programs so large?
While it is certainly true that current HTML does a lot more than HTML 3.2 did, the specification itself is also a lot more detailed which adds significant amount of content to the spec. Compare the length of HTML 3.2's description of the EM element -- a full eight or nine words -- with the length of the same in the HTML 5 spec -- for me, more than a screenful including surrounding material describing the element, where it is applicable and what its intended use is.
Sep
22
comment What's the name for the 'spec' of a function/method?
Signature yes, "spec" no. (FWIW, I think your answer is quite good, and well cited.)
Sep
22
comment What's the name for the 'spec' of a function/method?
I would include also at least what the method does when talking about its "spec". Depending on the focus of the day I may or may not include whatever additional information is necessary to implement the method.
Sep
18
comment C: How does struct node * next work?
You can also, of course, have each member of the list point both at the "next" and the "previous" element of the list. This requires a bit more bookkeeping when modifying the list, but allows traversing the list in any direction which can be advantageous on reads. As with everything else in engineering, it's a tradeoff.
Sep
18
comment C: How does struct node * next work?
Actually, it would be more correct to have the arrow from "next" point to "Object" (or perhaps even better, at the top left corner of the following box). As it stands, it looks like it's pointing at the "next" member of the struct, but in reality it's pointing at the next data instance's base address. You can also choose what the final element's "next" should point at; it can point at e.g. NULL (in which case the list can only be traversed in one direction), or it could point at the first element of the list (forming a circular linked list).
Sep
1
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
13
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
26
revised What is the Best Collation for Use in MySQL Tables?
added 942 characters in body
Jun
9
comment What is the “type” of data that pointers hold in the C language?
@Rob In a segmented memory model, a pointer can be either a single value (an address relative to the start of the segment; an offset) with the segment implied, or a segment/selector and offset pair. (I think Intel used the term "selector"; I'm too lazy to look it up.) On the 8086, these were represented as two 16-bit integers, which combined to form one 20-bit physical address. (Yes, you could address the same memory cell in many, many different ways, if you were so inclined: address=(segment<<4 + offset) & 0xfffff.) This carried forward through all x86 compatibles when running in real mode.
May
18
comment The principle of least knowledge
Related: Is code like this a “train wreck” (in violation of Law of Demeter)? (full disclosure: that's my own question)
May
6
comment Should we define types for everything?
And of course, what does 05-03-2015 mean when interpreted as a date?