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seen May 5 at 0:43

the cows are here to take me home now...


Feb
2
comment Studies on how noise affects productivity of programmers
@Pierre303 Most likely those people think that it's off-topic because it's a question that applies to all lines of work and not just to programming. To which I'd disagree, because the nature of the programming workflow is such that you go in and out of focus all the time -- so it's likely to be affected by noise differently than others, and so warrants its own research.
Feb
2
comment Studies on how noise affects productivity of programmers
@Pierre303 Ahh, cool.
Feb
2
comment Studies on how noise affects productivity of programmers
Is there any information on what kind of noise this is? White? Pink? Music? Environmental? Chatter?
Feb
2
comment Studies on how noise affects productivity of programmers
Why close this question?
Jan
30
answered How to determine number of resources to be allocated in a software project?
Jan
22
revised Research on software defects
deleted 7 characters in body
Jan
22
revised Research on software defects
Kept most of the content the same, but rearranged it to emphasize different points.
Jan
22
comment Research on software defects
@AndresF. I think so, it's technically a different class of code, but I'm certain that things like type definitions (which wouldn't exist in dynamic languages, and which in the DbC community are considered to be a type of contract) weren't exempt from the LOC count in the study. I also recognize that that's different from the matter of conceptual density in terse languages leading to cognitive difficulty, but the question seems to ask about both.
Jan
22
answered Research on software defects
Jan
21
comment Research on software defects
@Winston I apologize.
Jan
21
comment Research on software defects
@WinstonEwert It's a fact that programs with less LOC were measured to have less defects. It's not a fact that programs with less LOC have less defects. The former kind of "fact" is a historical fact; the latter is a logical fact.
Jan
21
comment Research on software defects
@WinstonEwert No, an observation can just happen to have been consistent for a long time and then be contradicted by a counterexample. It happens all the time, and there are often cases (such as this one) where there is reason to believe that it will happen. A fact is established to be necessarily true, and there is no reason to believe that it will ever be falsified. Small stars have never been observed to die, but that doesn't mean that they don't die.
Jan
21
comment Research on software defects
I think the attitude that "more is always worse" is a knee-jerk cultural overreaction to companies like IBM in the 80s judging programmer productivity by LOC written, to which Bill Gates famously responded that it's like measuring aircraft progress by weight.
Jan
21
comment Research on software defects
@S.Lott That's an observation, not a fact.
Jan
21
comment Research on software defects
@JohnFX Definitely. Language features like contracts are extremely verbose, but they are effective at reducing code defects.
Jan
16
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
16
answered Word for red flags / warning signs?
Jan
15
comment C++ for C# Developers
@Cody MFC is great if you need to work with Win32 for whatever reason -- but it's completely outdated in academia, because coding against Win32 API directly is an outdated notion, or at least a very esoteric one. There is no academic value to MFC as there was in the past, because concepts of UI programming can be taught much more clearly and generally with other APIs.
Jan
15
comment C++ for C# Developers
You will see C code used in C++ whether you write C or not yourself, and consequentially, if you're learning C++, you need to learn C. As I've said, I don't condone it, but the fact of the matter is that schools generally teach C and then tack on C++ later, because students need to be taught things like OS design -- which, excluding BeOS and certain research OSes, absolutely require C. For that, you do need to understand C strings. Again, for the third time, if I had my way, I would not teach C++ at all to first year students, and for the last time, that's completely besides the point.