1,364 reputation
817
bio website oatmealandcoffee.com
location Boston, MA
age 43
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Feb 1 at 16:05

By day, I am the Director of Publishing Technology at Jones & Bartlett Learning. I spend most of my time in Xcode and Applescript.

At night, I am a degree candidate at Harvard University, Extension School working towards a Bachelor of Liberal Arts with a concentration in Computer Science.

The rest of the time, such as it is, I futz around with my website, Oatmeal & Coffee.


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revised Java or C++ for university CS courses?
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Mar
11
comment Java or C++ for university CS courses?
@Yannis: While technically "not constructive", the question has not generated any kind of heated debate or arguments, and I am still getting good answers to this. I just got another one in the comments. Please re-open it. Thanks
Mar
11
revised Java or C++ for university CS courses?
Update on how things have turned out now that I am a year into school
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Sep
16
comment Can we replace XML with JSON entirely?
@S.Lott: I understand where you are coming from. Yes, I agree with the notion that XML can be self-explanatory, in and of itself. I am neither agreeing nor disagreeing with the notion that XML deserves that title over other technologies because I do not have enough experience to properly speak to that point. I have a suspicion that you will not find a point of evidence that says XML is most deserving of that title because the actual statement of the concept has been lost in the mist of programming culture, that simply the goal of XML—tagging content—is what drives that notion.
Sep
16
comment Can we replace XML with JSON entirely?
@S.Lott: I see your question now. I think because it is a cultural issue, anyone would be hard-pressed to find real evidence of how XML gets the "self-explanatory" moniker. Popularity, perhaps? Marketing? I don't know much about Scheme, so I can't make a specific comparison.
Sep
16
comment Can we replace XML with JSON entirely?
@S.Lott: Again, I think you are being too literal here. It would seem to me that the mere act of tagging content *can*—has the potential—to make it self-explanatory. <v>random datum</v> is still better than just random datum. Whether the developer chooses to use meaningful tags isn't XML's problem to solve.
Sep
16
comment Can we replace XML with JSON entirely?
@S.Lott: I think it is unfair to judge XML on face value of spec like you are. I agree that the answer given here is incorrect because it is stating self-explanation as fact; self-explanation is not an explicit feature of XML within the spec. At the same time, I do think that the spirit of XML is to allow data to be self-explanatory, and that is where the responsibility of developers comes in. XML provides the tools, but it is the developer to answer the particular question of self-explanation in the face of their no being DTD. And that would apply to pretty much everything we do.
Sep
16
comment Can we replace XML with JSON entirely?
A discussion about the differences between two technologies to see where improvements can be made is very different than asking whether one can be replaced with the other. The former is more scholarly review than the latter which sounds more antagonistic from frustration than anything
Sep
16
comment Can we replace XML with JSON entirely?
@S.Lott: If you take the spec by itself, then no, you are not going to find support for self-explanation as a design goal. But as programmers, then I think we have a responsibility by default to ensure that it is self-explanatory. I think the same could be said of JSON or any other tagging language.
Sep
16
comment Can we replace XML with JSON entirely?
@maartinus: My field of expertise is in book publishing: textbooks of any kind are deep, complex beasts with a wide array of content that requires explicit management. DocBook and DITA are much more readable than the example given above.
Sep
16
comment Can we replace XML with JSON entirely?
@S.Lott: I think what he means by that is the nature of XML tags, in and of themselves, allows tagged content to be self-explanatory, i.e., DTDs are optional so well-formed XML can be parsed without one. But I agree with your take on the issue because, technically, JSON has the same capability, so I don't see self-explanation being the main difference at all (I'm not sure why this keeps getting voted up), but rather Michael Kay is more on the mark.
Sep
16
comment Can we replace XML with JSON entirely?
@SK-Logic: That's great for a trivial example, but I couldn't imagine doing deeply nested, mixed content—like a book—with that. I think SXML is as much an academic exercise as anything.