818 reputation
510
bio website oopstruggles.blogspot.com
location Wisconsin
age 33
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Sep 9 '11 at 3:40

I'm currently an in-house developer at a company that specializes in seminars for healthcare professionals. I specialize in OOP, C#, and MSSQL Server.


Mar
14
awarded  Scholar
Mar
14
accepted Number of Classes in a Namespace - Code Smell?
Feb
15
comment How to deal with the “programming blowhard”?
+1 for considering that he might not realize the effect he's having. Most people who annoy us have no idea what they're doing, and often, we end up interpreting what someone says based on our experiences, which are different than theirs, and so we've attached meaning to a behavior and setup "rules" that no one knows about but us.
Feb
3
awarded  Student
Feb
3
asked Number of Classes in a Namespace - Code Smell?
Feb
2
answered What is the most frequently used design pattern?
Jan
11
awarded  Autobiographer
Jan
7
answered How to explain OOP concepts to a non technical person?
Dec
3
comment What hat should a programmer not wear?
As others have mentioned, there is gray area, here. I believe that one of my roles at my firm is to maximize the value I add. If I spend time getting a paper shredder to work, simply because my boss asks me to, it's my responsibility to at least suggest that this may be a better task for a person who doesn't have software to write.
Dec
3
comment How to get money from reluctant client?
If you purchased a domain name or hosting, and didn't pay, you would lose your hosting or domain name. That's the nature of market capitalism; however, the business-savvy thing to do may be to offer monthly hosting services to this person, and get small increments of cash that way on a consistent basis. You could also setup a payment plan for the design services. This may be an opportunity to turn a frustrating situation into a profitable one.
Nov
30
comment Working with fubar/refuctored code
I inherited some egregiously bad code, and I thought it would be cool to build interface code that allows the existing code to mostly stay as-is, while at the same time, over-engineering new code in a manner that wasn't really appropriate for the scope of the project. Now, I have 2 problems: 1. The old, sucky code still exists; 2. The new code is overly complex, and difficult to debug, troubleshoot, extend, maintain, etc. I would have been better off with @Ginamin's option B.
Nov
22
answered Which things instantly ring alarm bells when looking at code?
Nov
16
answered How do you dive into large code bases?
Nov
10
answered How to you “sell” support as an career option
Nov
10
answered How do you approach database design?
Nov
4
comment Is it ever ok to have an empty catch statement?
Then .Debug() eats the exception and I never know about it. But I feel a lot more confident about my logger than I feel about code that often throws exceptions. If I were concerned about that, I suppose I could implement some sort of pattern that watches for entry into the catch block, and saves it for later. In any case - point taken
Nov
4
answered Is it ever ok to have an empty catch statement?
Nov
2
awarded  Supporter
Nov
2
comment What made object oriented programming successful?
This might be the perfect answer - information full, yet short enough so the reader doesn't have to read a novel. Bravo
Nov
1
answered Why is OOP difficult?