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seen May 3 '11 at 4:37

Dec
8
comment How could your company's learning/development department best serve you?
@HedgeMage fair enough. If youre in a tight-knit group of such dev-types, perfect, but reality for many of us is often very different. We are surrounded by devs/engineers satisfied with getting by and status-quo. I can push myself to my furthest limits of training and understanding, but if my team/colleagues can't interact with me at that level or using at least some of those skills (thus meaning we can't get anything done together), much of it is for naught from a workplace perspective.
Dec
8
awarded  Critic
Dec
8
comment How could your company's learning/development department best serve you?
When would we actually eat? I like the idea, but I'd be too into taking notes, trying sample codes, googling stuff I didn't know that I wouldn't be able to put that precious piece of pizza in my mouth. my...precioussss...
Dec
8
comment How could your company's learning/development department best serve you?
2 and 3 assume too much vested interest in their jobs - a lot of guys don't want to spend their free time (ie lunch) working on work-related things, nor spend their worktime working on non-work things (open source projects). I personally would love to have both, but Im just a big programming weirdo...
Dec
8
comment How could your company's learning/development department best serve you?
I see two types of corporate training - one-offs that serve as "enrichment" to current skill set. The accuracy and quality of these courses is probably enhanced well by feedback/suggestion mechs. Second type - courses that are part of a larger goal or career path - require feedback but also better guidance and a firmer hand to both ensure content relevancy and keep workers on track and moving forward on these larger study arcs.
Dec
8
answered How could your company's learning/development department best serve you?
Nov
25
comment How to read thousands lines of code without any documentation?
bang your head against the desk until it all becomes clear.
Nov
25
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
25
comment What are the essential things I should know about the Mac?
Smultron is pretty awesome and free for a text editor. no longer maintained though :( sad face. smultron.sourceforge.net
Nov
25
comment What are the essential things I should know about the Mac?
How to lock the screen: macworld.com/article/49080/2006/01/lockscreen.html How to keep the screensaver/autolock from engaging (when watching movies etc): download.cnet.com/Caffeine/3000-2094_4-11327884.html
Nov
25
comment What are the essential things I should know about the Mac?
Stuffit Expander/Unarchiver for your zip and other archive file needs. These programs don't let you browse contents before you unpackage, it just unpackages to a folder and asks questions later.
Nov
25
comment What are the essential things I should know about the Mac?
understand what all the hot key symbols mean (the graphical representations of shift, control, command, etc). When I first got my mac it took me a few days to remember these symbols.
Nov
25
comment What are the essential things I should know about the Mac?
ruby and RoR is preinstalled!
Nov
23
awarded  Commentator
Nov
23
answered I feel lost among the various web technologies and I'm looking for pointers
Nov
19
comment Does your company have a coding standard?
not writing it down seems to invite a chicken-egg paradox. which came first? the code or the standard..
Nov
15
awarded  Student
Nov
15
answered In a resume, what all constitutes a Programming Language
Nov
15
comment Which approach to follow for developing applications targeting multiple platforms?
@Gulshan Sorry, obvious question - is there a reason this can't be a web application and/or done w/ something like Adobe Air?
Nov
12
comment What are some things you have read that inspired and guided you as a programmer?
I hoped more people would upvote this. This book is amazing! It's not so much a guide for programming technique as it is strategy; showing you how to approach your programming career (and the profession of programming in general) by thinking of it as a life-long path and viewing yourself as an aspiring craftsman of a skilled art.