11,330 reputation
22547
bio website purl.org/net/oakley
location Barrington, IL
age 54
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen yesterday

I started as a FORTRAN programmer, paid my dues writing C and X11/Motif, switched to Perl, discovered Tk, and from that, Tcl, and spent the next decade plus writing cross-platform GUIs in Tcl/Tk.

I then spent three years using python and a smattering of ruby to create a cross-platform automated testing framework. I am now working in an all-Windows shop, again building an automated testing framework.

My company is hiring like crazy! Contact me if you want to work for one of the fastest growing companies in the U.S. - #42 on Deloitte's 2011 Technology Fast 500. We're also a 2011 Best and Brightest Companies to Work For national winner.


Apr
17
comment How do you learn Regular Expressions?
I don't agree with the opening statement at all. When I learned regular expressions I knew nothing about automata theory. Three decades later I still don't. What I did know was how to read a man page, take it literally, and how to experiment at a prompt.
Apr
8
comment Should I bother to write unit test for UI/UX Components?
I think "completely worthless" is way too strong. The advice "always test from the user perspective and work backwards" is equally shakey advice. General consensus in much of the QA literature suggests you should have more unit tests than any other type of test (google "testing triangle").
Apr
4
comment The place of UI design when estimating and elaborating user stories
Yes. You'll need to just do a wild guess for the first sprint. From then on, the number of stories you pull into a sprint should be based on your average velocity. If you really need to estimate the whole release, give a range of estimates. Say "we estimate 150 points for the release, so if we do 20 points per sprint that's about 8 sprints, if we do 25 that's about 6" and so on.
Apr
4
revised The place of UI design when estimating and elaborating user stories
added 46 characters in body
Apr
4
comment The place of UI design when estimating and elaborating user stories
I think your understanding of scrum is flawed. You don't "decide how many sprints". Instead, you do release planning where you outline all of your epics and stories. You give them the best estimate that you can. You will often be wrong about those estimates (typically underestimating). You total up all the points, and you divide by the average number of points your team has done over the past release. that tells you how many sprints it will take. Obviously, if your team has no average, you can't accurately calculate how many sprints.
Apr
4
answered The place of UI design when estimating and elaborating user stories
Apr
3
answered Why can't a User Story be attached to more than one Feature?
Apr
3
comment Why can't a User Story be attached to more than one Feature?
Are you asking about a specific feature in TFS, or a general question about writing stories?
Mar
31
comment How does Observer create loosely-coupled design?
@Prog: B and C do not have to share a common supertype. They can be completely different types of objects. They simply must each support whatever interface is used for the observer pattern. For example, maybe they only need to subscribe to messages on an event bus.
Mar
28
answered Iteratively building a Test Framework
Mar
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
20
comment UX designers working one Sprint ahead
re: "being involved in the ux process qualifies as "working" on a story." Not necessarily. People come and ask me questions all the time, that doesn't mean I'm working on their stories.
Mar
20
comment UX designers working one Sprint ahead
You say "Your UX designers are making decisions... without involving the developers". How do you know? Just because they are working one sprint ahead doesn't imply they aren't working with the developers. Perhaps the developers are their stakeholder. This also goes to point 4 -- you're assuming developers are being excluded but that isn't necessarily the case. As for "Designers are not delivering value", I couldn't disagree more. You see no value in properly designed UX? While I think you raise some discussion-worthy points, you're making a lot of assumptions that might not be true.
Mar
17
answered How to Think like a computer Scientist. Chapter 3, Question 2
Mar
16
comment UX designers working one Sprint ahead
@Sklivvz: I guess we have to agree to disagree. While it's true that working software is the primary measure of progress, it's not the only measure. Some amount of design must be done up front before a team can start coding. UX isn't something you can just tack on at the end.
Mar
15
answered UX designers working one Sprint ahead
Mar
14
comment How often should a Scrum team meet its Sprint commitment?
@RobY: I think there's room for commitment in mature teams. In my experience, most agile teams aren't particularly mature, and any PO asking for a commitment is not a good PO. I was on one team that was pretty rock-solid with its velocity and we felt quite comfortable making actual commitments when necessary, but the other teams I've been on haven't been as mature.
Mar
14
answered How often should a Scrum team meet its Sprint commitment?
Mar
14
comment How often should a Scrum team meet its Sprint commitment?
@Ptolemy: teams can't technically "cut testing" since testing is part of the story. If they cut it, it's no different than cutting part of the coding. If you omit part of the coded feature, are you completing a story? Likewise, if you cut testing, you aren't completing the story.
Mar
13
revised Scrum for Embedded system devices
to->too *sigh*