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Jun
1
revised Hardcoding strings that will never change
added 92 characters in body
Jun
1
comment Hardcoding strings that will never change
@ptyx: you highlight an important point. I haven't specified how are the rules stored, which led readers think that it should be in an XML or JSON (don't know why, since I never mentioned neither of two). The answer is now edited and should be clearer. Where I disagree with you is that your approach has a drawback of forcing a recompile every time a rule should be added or changed.
Jun
1
revised Hardcoding strings that will never change
added 287 characters in body
Jun
1
comment Hardcoding strings that will never change
@ChrisCirefice: as I said in my answer, if there is only a "minor probability that the app will be extended somewhere in the future" [to other languages], then hardcoding those 17 conjugation patterns is the right thing to do.
Jun
1
revised Hardcoding strings that will never change
added 653 characters in body
Jun
1
revised Hardcoding strings that will never change
added 653 characters in body
Jun
1
comment Hardcoding strings that will never change
@ChrisCirefice: do you think Microsoft Word's spelling engine has everything hardcoded in it? Your case is essentially the same. Yes, grammar and structure varies; this makes it even more important to move this part outside your code.
Jun
1
answered Hardcoding strings that will never change
May
31
awarded  Enlightened
May
31
awarded  Nice Answer
May
30
reviewed Approve Applicability of the Joel Test to web development companies
May
29
comment Any benefits of writing coding articles
@AbhishekK: about your second question, I'm referring to any programmer, since even the most junior one can benefit from such notes. When I start learning a programming language or a new technology, I have such notes, which can look extremely dumb for anyone but juniors (like how do you search for text in a file in Python).
May
29
comment Any benefits of writing coding articles
@AbhishekK: it depends on the content of your blog. If there are large parts of code which looks a lot like the code from your companies' project, then yes, it can backfire (and can lead to serious legal consequences anyway). If there are just short snippets of code, I don't see how this could be a problem for any sane interviewer.
May
29
revised Any benefits of writing coding articles
added 1678 characters in body
May
29
answered Any benefits of writing coding articles
May
29
awarded  Enlightened
May
29
awarded  Nice Answer
May
29
comment How to display/clarify the licence for code in a blog
@mguassa: you may be interested by opensource.org/licenses website. BSD-2 and BSD-3, Apache License 2.0 and MIT license, for instance, are fine, since they make it possible to use the code within proprietary and/or closed source products. If you're unsure which license is the best for you, for your particular case, please consult a lawyer.
May
28
answered CI Server vs Build Server
May
27
answered How to display/clarify the licence for code in a blog