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Mar
18
awarded  c#
Mar
17
comment Why use Razor Syntax?
You're welcome. Also, make sure you have a good grasp of MVC itself. If you've already used MVC with other languages, check for the differences, since there could be different practices. For instance, I've seen a few non-.NET projects where MVC models contained a lot of business logic. In .NET, this is very rare. But in ASP.NET MVC, models often contain validation rules, which is not necessarily the case in other frameworks/languages.
Mar
17
comment Why use Razor Syntax?
See also: Biggest advantage to using ASP.Net MVC vs web forms as well as When to favor ASP.NET WebForms over MVC.
Mar
17
comment Why use Razor Syntax?
ASP.NET has a very different model compared to ASP.NET MVC. In ASP.NET, you have HTML in a sort of a template (which is not), and the codebehind. What happens is that business logic is scattered around, and it's very easy to end up with SQL queries in templates or with chunks of HTML in codebehind. ASP.NET MVC makes it much less natural to do this; this is a good thing, but it also means that in order to set a value of a field to something which comes from your business logic, you have to change the controller, the model and the view all together.
Mar
17
comment Why use Razor Syntax?
@DateTime.Now is just an illustration good for tutorials, but not much else. This is exactly the stuff which should go in controllers and passed to the views through the models. What do you mean by timeLabelValue.Text example? You are talking about ASP.NET, right?
Mar
17
revised Why use Razor Syntax?
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Mar
17
answered Why use Razor Syntax?
Mar
16
revised Is scientific code a different enough realm to ignore common coding standards?
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Mar
16
answered Is scientific code a different enough realm to ignore common coding standards?
Mar
16
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
15
comment Utility Classes in MVC - ASP.NET
@usr: not necessarily. The cases where well-designed (in OOP sense) code needs utility classes are extremely rare. Although there are situations where utility classes may be a good solution, most usage of them is plainly wrong. Also see: Are utility classes evil?
Mar
15
comment Is it okay for a class to use its own public method?
@Kapol: thank you for your feedback. I edited my answer by adding explanation about the first two points.
Mar
15
revised Is it okay for a class to use its own public method?
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Mar
15
comment Is it okay for a class to use its own public method?
@JDługosz: with virtual, you'll have the same effect as with abstract. Thus my agreement with Pokechu22's message.
Mar
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
14
comment Is it okay for a class to use its own public method?
@Pokechu22: indeed, virtual works too. In all cases, the signature, according to OP, is public void ReverseData(), so the part of the answer about overriding stuff is slightly misleading.
Mar
14
comment Is it okay for a class to use its own public method?
@StevieV: yes, of course.
Mar
14
comment Is it okay for a class to use its own public method?
"so that someone isn't surprised when overriding ReverseData() changes the way ScheduleTransmission() works": no, not really. At least not in C# (note that the question has a C# tag). Unless ReverseData() is abstract, no matter what you do in the child class, it's always the original method which will be called.
Mar
14
revised Is it okay for a class to use its own public method?
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Mar
14
answered Is it okay for a class to use its own public method?