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bio website epistemex.com
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visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Apr 18 '14 at 7:20

Website        GitHub        Animations and videos        3D Stills

I believe in the old-school way of learning, that is, learning by example; in life and elsewhere. This is why I also tend to provide an example in my answers (and I usually don't mind doing so as I love to code and help others at the same time).

I also believe in keeping things as simple as possible. Over the three past decades+ that I have been doing this, I have seen this as a key which leads to fewer bugs, simpler and reduced need for maintenance, more performance and more stable software.

I started with BASIC (and some Cobol), then used 68k assembler for a decade on the Amiga platform, now .Net (less than before) and for the most part JavaScript and browser/graphic oriented stuff. I have a wide spectrum of areas I have coded in, from low-level stuff to multi-user business platforms.

I am originally from Scandinavia, live in America, married, father and an explorer always eager to learn something new.

As I'm not native English speaker my apologies in advance if my cultural aspect of expression and idioms of what I write is lost in translation. I do however intend my "tone" to be nice, but "serious" (as in helping).

I do take side-projects if they are interesting and if you are willing to pay for an experienced, quality-focused developer/engineer. Send mail to github at epistemex dt com (emails with questions for SO-posts are ignored, sorry!).


Dec
16
comment “A good programmer can be as 10X times more productive than a mediocre one”
What companies pay for is primarily experience and knowledge ("know-how"). These will result in more rapid development (less caveat, less trial-and-error and so forth) and a fresh developer simply doesn't have this (with emphasis on experience). An experienced developer tend to find a good solution for almost anything that is asked of him.
Nov
11
comment projective geometry: how do I turn a projection of a rectangle in 3D into a 2D view
There is really no need to consider correct perspective as such. If you project an image that originally is square/rectangle it will "re-gain" (by the means of interpolation) that information when morphed into a equal rectangle. What you might encounter as a problem is lens distortion (bending lines). To solve this you will need more details on the "square" to compensate for the bending.
Oct
6
comment ASP.NET Webforms developers and web designers: how to interact?
Last line = joke