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visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen Feb 8 '13 at 11:14

Dec
2
comment Why does Java allow to implement different interfaces, each containing a method with the same signature?
Thank for your reply, but in case when there is two interfaces with two methods with the same signature but different return type, you couldn't implement bot of them. And nobody couldn't predict that.
Dec
2
asked Is “Interface inheritance” always safe?
Dec
2
comment Why does Java allow to implement different interfaces, each containing a method with the same signature?
Thank you for your answer. You can implement two interfaces containing methods with different signatures in Java. But I found out that if you're extending two interfaces both having a method with a same signature but different returning types, then it'll be a compile time error: The return types are incompatible for the inherited methods Fooable.foo(int), AnotherFooable.foo(int).
Dec
2
comment Why does Java allow to implement different interfaces, each containing a method with the same signature?
I just meant that a third interface extending both that interfaces will contain both methods from that interfaces which is actually a single method. And that's I can't undertand too.
Nov
28
asked Why does Java allow to implement different interfaces, each containing a method with the same signature?
Nov
28
accepted Help me understand a part of Java Language Specification
Nov
28
suggested suggested edit on Help me understand a part of Java Language Specification
Nov
28
comment Help me understand a part of Java Language Specification
I asked about it on the concurrency interest mailing list and they replied that hard copy of JLS contains additional numbered point on "Thread t does not execute any further instructions". So step 2 that is referred to on step 3 (which is actually a step 4) is that step with a missing numbered point. So it's just a missed numbered point that caused a confusion.
Nov
27
comment Help me understand a part of Java Language Specification
I believe it's the only reason, because logically no way what is written can be true.
Nov
27
accepted Help me understand a phrase from the “Java concurrency in practice”
Nov
27
asked Help me understand a part of Java Language Specification
Nov
22
comment Help me understand a phrase from the “Java concurrency in practice”
Also thanks for helping me to understand a meaning of post-conditions.
Nov
19
comment Help me understand a phrase from the “Java concurrency in practice”
If you're right and this should read as post-conditions, thank you very much!
Nov
19
asked Help me understand a phrase from the “Java concurrency in practice”
Nov
17
comment About insertion sort and especially why it's said that copy is much faster than swap?
AFAIK, Java 5 has 'compareAndSet' atomic operation (which is used in concurrent applications), so I believe that it can optimize swap to be a single instruction. Because of this I'm even more confused about what author says.
Nov
17
awarded  Commentator
Nov
17
comment About insertion sort and especially why it's said that copy is much faster than swap?
Well, if compare bubble sort and insertion sort, in case of bubble sort we're doing n^2 swaps (n*(n-1)/2 to be precise, but for big O notation it doesn't matter), right? in case of insertion sort we're doing n^2 copies. So in first case we're doing 9n^2 copies (if 3 copies = 1 swap), and in second case we're doing n^2 copies. So anyway, for big O notation, we're doing same amount of copies and because copy as I believe is very fast 9n^2 is almost the same as n^2. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
Nov
15
asked Question on refactoring and code design
Nov
14
asked About insertion sort and especially why it's said that copy is much faster than swap?
Nov
7
awarded  Nice Question