1,798 reputation
916
bio website MarkDontBlog
location United Kingdom
age 43
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Dec 3 at 13:25

Developer in scientific fields.

  • My world is vertical market shrinkwrap. Do you know your world?
  • VB6, VB.NET, C, Fortran, Perl, PHP...
  • User interfaces, graphics, data manipulation, numerical models.
  • Database stuff with Access/MySQL/SQL Server.
  • Physics degree, little formal training in development

In my young days I used to write things like compilers and chess programs for fun - but that was last millenium :)


Jun
27
comment Documenting mathematical logic in code
+1. If the reference is to a recent publication, give the DOI hyperlink to the paper. Example dx.doi.org/10.1000/182. This is exactly what DOI was designed for - a short, standard URL for a publication, guaranteed never to change.
Jun
25
comment Is it a good practice to wrap all primitives and Strings?
Similar to this question. Not an exact duplicate: you have linked to a less dogmatic article than the one linked in the other question.
Jun
19
comment Should I be worried about overengineering programming assignments given during interview process?
@DormoTheNord I would tell the interviewer how long you spent on the exercise (and make sure it's less than 3 hours). Fears about gold-plating should not arise if you do the exercise in the time they are expecting.
Jun
17
answered Is using subprocedures to logically separate my code a bad idea for structured programming?
Jun
14
comment Is 25% to me as sole author a good deal?
I think it's a good situation, and you should be able to get a good deal out of it. Do invest some time in negotiating it and thinking about it. Bobson is correct - having a lawyer look at it could save lots of money and pain later.
Jun
14
revised Is 25% to me as sole author a good deal?
added 6 characters in body
Jun
14
revised Is 25% to me as sole author a good deal?
added 2 characters in body
Jun
14
answered Is 25% to me as sole author a good deal?
Jun
13
revised Why is Python written in C and not in C++?
link for Joels blog post on rewrites
Jun
13
comment Why is Python written in C and not in C++?
Just submitted an edit with a link to Joel's blog post on rewrites joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000069.html
Jun
13
suggested approved edit on Why is Python written in C and not in C++?
Jun
11
comment Why would anyone invest time in Microsoft “Roslyn”?
+1 for sematic diff. For interest here's a link to a commercial product under development which uses Roslyn for semantic diff. (Full disclosure - I have no connection with them, I just saw their product mentioned on Jon Skeet's blog)
May
31
comment Semantic versioning for desktop applications
+1 The marketing department must control the "product version" that the customers know about. It's part of marketing, like the brand name, and it's their job to worry about this stuff. The software developers must control the internal product identifiers that enable binary products to be identified and linked back to specific source code. Therefore these two identifiers should be completely decoupled.
May
28
comment Java language constructs to enforce design decisions
All of them? programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/50179/…
May
27
comment Does software in a professional environment need to be licensed?
+1 You can run GPL code on a public server without having to release your source. But AGPL is different: if you run AGPL code on a public server, you must release your source to the public. That's the difference between GPL and AGPL.
May
23
comment Increasing User Changes/Requirements in Agile Methodology
@parsifal Yes, adding more people is bad near the end of a project. But earlier on, its fine. And managers underestimate how much is left to go. stevemcconnell.com/ieeesoftware/eic08.htm
May
22
comment “Open-source” licenses that explicitly prohibit military applications
Is this your decision to make? Is it really your software? I assume someone funds you? What do they think about this? Do you have an employer? What does your contract say? Personally I'd argue any software that was funded from taxes should be made free under an unrestrictive license.
May
20
comment How common is it for a team to write everything in-house?
+1 If the missing feature is really, truly, crucial: modify the open-source library and contribute the feature into the main source. Delivers great business value, makes everyone feel good and it's excellent for everyone's CVs because they now have now made an open-source contribution.
May
20
comment Never had a job - Will it matter for internship?
I don't agree this is a duplicate of the other question, since you have code experience but not work experience. It's nice to have some work experience, of any kind, provided you make the most of it on your CV. E.g. you explain how folding shirts/flipping burgers developed your teamwork skills. But it's not essential by any means. The self-employed freelance thing would be great, especially if you can put something concrete on your CV: some customer testimonials, or links to real-world sites that you made. Key point: whatever you do, write on your CV about how it developed you in some way.
May
18
comment How do you know you're writing good code?
@jeffo Here's Joel's story about f-word counting as a metric of Bill Gates' technical satisfaction joelonsoftware.com/items/2006/06/16.html