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Slowing converting from Stack Overflow lurker into a contributing member.


Oct
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awarded  Good Question
Oct
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awarded  Popular Question
Oct
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Oct
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comment Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
Lots of helpful insights from the various answers given (thanks to all!). Selected this one for answering the question explicitly: "Theoretically no, but practically yes."
Oct
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accepted Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
Oct
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Oct
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revised Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
fixed grammar typo
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Oct
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comment Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
@Andy -- I can see it sounds that way. But these text editors are actually very powerful, offering a ton of tooling and programmer efficiency features. It's just a radically different way of getting at and using those tools and features than an IDE (and one that may be more or less appropriate for certain languages/programming cultures).
Oct
15
comment Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
@JimmyHoffa - thanks, that's helpful for understanding the C# culture.
Oct
15
comment Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
@MichaelKjörling - thanks. In Python you have to import stuff to use it -- that's definitely a difference. But my hangup is about reading not writing code. When you see a reference to a name, how do you know where it's from? The Pythonic way is: look for the import (which should be explicit by convention). The C# way, I'm coming to understand, is: use the IDE features and/or Google the docs.
Oct
15
comment Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
Not that I couldn't choose to use this idiosyncratically -- but coding isn't an isolated art and I think it's best to follow (or at least start with) the norms of a coding culture -- i.e. be "Pythonic" with Python and whatever the equivalent "C# way" is with C#. And it's clear from the answers and comments here that using a good IDE like Visual Studio is central to the "C# way" (if that's the right way to put it).
Oct
15
comment Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
Thanks for the additional thoughts. By the way, funny you mention this. The (enforced) use of self in Python (to the point of even having to include self as the first parameter for a method) is one of the most distinctive features of the language -- and a good example of its philosophy of "explicit is better than implicit". It's another thing that will require a mental shift for me with C# culture. [continued in next comment]
Oct
15
comment Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
@BinaryWorrier -- Python folks actually use a ton of tooling also; it just often via command-line tools and visually-minimalist-but-feature-rich-text-editors-with-lots-of-keyboard-shortcut‌​s-or-commands like Sublime Text 2 and vim. The end result in terms of getting lots of coding conveniences may not be all that different, but the way you get and think about those conveniences sure is.
Oct
15
comment Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
On a separate note, var in C# is nice syntatic sugar/compiler shortcut that I like for making code less verbose and repetitive. Just wish you could use it everywhere, not just inside methods.
Oct
15
comment Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
That approach exemplifies the cultural difference. Not that Python programmers don't google stuff -- of course they do -- it's just the way of thinking about it is different.
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awarded  Commentator
Oct
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comment Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
The issue is reading not writing code. (The Stack Overflow question I link to above gives an example.) When reading code, how do you know where something comes from? With Python, you can look for an explicit import (assuming the code follows the strong Python conventions for using such imports). With C#, it seems the consensus is that in practice you use an IDE like VS.
Oct
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comment Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
By the way, it could be argued that Python is also its own monoculture, given then strong adherence to what is considered "Pythonic" in coding style and approach, and the language's core design principle of having one obvious right way to do things. I tend to think programming monocultures in this sense can be very good, as it creates a coherent community and shareable code. It's just (too bad? and/or an opportunity to expand my mind?) that the Python and C# cultures are so... different!
Oct
15
comment Is C# development effectively inseparable from the IDE you use?
Thanks, that's helpful context.