1,569 reputation
512
bio website student.johnpdaigle.com
location Atlanta, GA
age 42
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen May 4 '13 at 10:55

Coder, algorithm designer, father of two, pizza fanatic, and secret musician.


Jul
3
awarded  Necromancer
Nov
2
awarded  Yearling
Jun
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
5
comment Examples of Finite State Machines
@slomojo The "G" is for "Generalized", the sequential algorithm from which this is derived uses a technique called generalized maximal matching.
Nov
2
awarded  Yearling
Sep
8
comment How can I convince my boss that ANSI C is inadequate for our new project?
There's more COBOL code in production than any other single language. So to get away from having someone around who understands COBOL, you better be ready to write a lot of software.
Sep
8
comment Introducing a (new) test method to a team
For virtualization, Vagrant is pretty awesome.
Sep
8
comment Can I assume interface oriented programming as a good object oriented programming?
Unit tests typically only test the functionality of a single object. Other objects should be mocked... you just want to know that the other (possibly future) interface will be called with the right values, or that if that future interface/object returns a value, your current object will behave as expected. I work in Agile shops and we use this sort of TDD to drive requirements and design. For Java, I recommend the book Test Driven (manning.com/koskela)
Sep
8
comment What are the drawbacks of Python?
This is really more a critique of the interpreter than the language. My understanding is that Jython bypasses the GIL and uses Java Threads, which typically are system threads.
Sep
8
comment Can I assume interface oriented programming as a good object oriented programming?
Without looking at your code, that's a tough question to answer. It's also somewhat language dependent: What's necessary and good in Java might be overkill in Ruby. However, I disagree with your premise that Test-First is slow: in my experience, writing tests first saves you time.
Sep
8
answered Introducing a (new) test method to a team
Sep
8
comment How much Ruby should I learn before moving to Rails?
Rails doesn't contain "some level of OOP". Every model is an object with methods, every controller is an object with methods. What Rails gives you is an established, controlled pattern that you must apply to your objects, saving you the trouble of figuring one out yourself.
Sep
8
answered How much Ruby should I learn before moving to Rails?
Aug
23
comment Is it easier to write robust code in compiled, strictly-typed languages?
General note: when you vote an answer down, it is polite to explain why.
Aug
22
comment Is it easier to write robust code in compiled, strictly-typed languages?
@user1598390 I understand what you mean. I just think the answer to your question is no, and I've explained why: Using a dynamically typed language does not imply that you have no type checking in the pre-compiler, it doesn't require that the coder write a lot of type checking to write robust code, and it doesn't change the number or intent of unit tests.
Aug
22
comment Is it easier to write robust code in compiled, strictly-typed languages?
@user1598390 Compilers will miss typos that are syntactically correct, and whether a language implementation is compiled or runs type checking is not a function of the type system. Even with compiled code in a static, strongly typed language, you can have a user interface that inserts bad values and types and need to handle such errors gracefully. I think you are confusing many issues.
Aug
22
comment Are all programming problems algorithm problems?
Apparently, it also depends on how you define "Algorithm". I would say that very few problems require novel algorithms, but that since a computer program has only two parts--algorithms and data structures--all problems require some algorithms, even if those algorithms are trivial. An algorithm isn't a mathematical model, it's a sequence of instructions.
Aug
22
revised Is it easier to write robust code in compiled, strictly-typed languages?
answered the objection about misspelled variable names.
Aug
22
comment Is it easier to write robust code in compiled, strictly-typed languages?
It seems that the OPs definition is very language specific. For example, by that definition, Scala is neither strictly typed or loosely typed - it has implicit typing, but you can't change the type once you've assigned it. It is "not strict". But Scala is going to have very different behavior than JavaScript when it comes to throwing type errors, so it doesn't really fit into the question.
Aug
22
comment Is it easier to write robust code in compiled, strictly-typed languages?
@user1598390 I get the feeling that you already know what answer you want, and are not interested in different perspectives on this question. I mean, having to compile the code and having to run the code are essentially equivalent from my point of view, so that's really a red herring. Your question is whether you have to write more code, not whether a particular mistake is more likely to be caught. I'm not going to write a bunch of type checking code to make sure I didn't misspell something.