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Sep
24
comment Case insensitive keywords in a language
No, then it'd be a minor point that's hardly answering the question phrased as an answer. IMHO.
Sep
24
comment Case insensitive keywords in a language
I'm sick of the argument "X is good, Y enforces related thing Z, therefore Y does good by enforcing X" (e.g. sane coding style/Python/offside rule). No good programmer capitalizes in a way that seriously impacts readability, even when allowed to. Those who do abuse case insensitivity also capitalize inconsistently in a case sensitive environment (and commit a hundred other atrocities), they are just forced to use the same bad capitalization for each use of an individual name. Bad programmers can write Fortran in any language. (Disclaimer: I'm a huge fan of case sensitivity!)
Sep
24
comment Case insensitive keywords in a language
Yeah, helpful as a comment ;)
Sep
24
comment Case insensitive keywords in a language
Good point, but not an answer.
Sep
21
awarded  Custodian
Sep
20
comment Learning Arlgorithms particularly graph algorithms (java)
The second edition is right next to me, totally worth the money. It indeed explains all these topics well. And it's still useful when you get all that, because of the second part which lists problems, algorithms that solve these problems or special cases of them, great implementations and research papers.
Sep
19
comment Java heap space
@KeithS Actually a lot of moving GCs, including the one in Microsoft's desktop CLR, do use direct pointers. That does require them to update pointers when moving objects, but they manage to keep the overhead acceptable. The big advantage is that you don't need a huge cache-hostile indirection for every single memory access.
Sep
18
comment What are the advantages of using a template language?
I know Python far better than any templating language, but outputting HTML (for instance) from Python is awful using just print without a lot of declarative support code (allowing things like with tag('p'): text('Hello world'), and that's actually much prettier than any real output code I ever wrote), and even then it doesn't close to the clarity and clutter-freedom of a good templating language. Have you ever used a good templating language? It's a bliss!
Sep
18
revised Analyzing Memory Usage: Java vs C++ Negligible?
added 315 characters in body
Sep
18
comment Java heap space
It's a horrid possibility, especially since many heap data structures (especially the simple, fast ones) are awful at increasing and decreasing the key. It also means relying on reference counting, which is not adequate garbage collection. Let's not even get into how an explicit heap data structure is unnecessary, or into implementation details of such a structure. As interesting as what if-questions are, this simply does not make any sense at all.
Sep
18
answered Java heap space
Sep
6
comment What technologies are used for Game development now days?
@9000 And how does this question qualify as not constructive?
Sep
6
comment What technologies are used for Game development now days?
From the looks of that analysis, Quake 3 predates quite a few vital "low level" techniques of today's game development. For starters, (OpenGL-supplied) shaders.
Sep
6
comment What technologies are used for Game development now days?
Of course, these engines are just regular (though highly optimized) C/C++ code building abstractions atop of lower-level APIs (e.g. DX or OpenGL for graphics).
Sep
6
comment Generating CMakeLists.txt
If it was flexible enough to qualify as powerful, it would boil down to an alternative syntax for CMake. Which hardly justifies the trouble of creating such a thing.
Sep
4
comment What's the next level of abstraction?
You appear to think that's a linear progression, with an ordering ("X is more abstract than Y is more abstract than Z"). I beg to differ.
Sep
3
revised How safe is it to rely on thirdparty Python libs in a production product?
Fixed irritating typo
Sep
3
comment Is functional programming a superset of object oriented?
@KonradRudolph I am aware of that. But as the common definition is quite useless and misleading in some senses ("You gotta have OOP to have abstraction"), the idealist and the multi-paradigm fan in me hope to lessen its effects. I'm not reproaching you, you are completely correct.
Sep
3
comment Is functional programming a superset of object oriented?
@KonradRudolph That does not make it any more acceptable. If anything, it's incentive to step up and giving those spreading it reason to re-consider it.
Sep
3
comment Is functional programming a superset of object oriented?
@KonradRudolph I know a lot of people claim these things and the benefits they bring as unique properties of OOP. Assuming "polymorphism" means "subtype polymorphism", I can go with the latter two being integral to OOP. But I have yet to encounter a useful definition of encapsulation and abstraction that excludes decidedly non-OOP approaches. You can hide details and limit access to them just fine even in Haskell. And the Haskell also has ad-hoc polymorphism, just not subtype polymorphism -- the question is, does the "subtype" bit matter?