267 reputation
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bio website ta.speot.is
location Brisbane, Australia
age 24
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Jan 28 at 7:27

I try to share knowledge of the arcane on my blog - I invite you to check it out.


Nov
7
comment Is it possible to implement an infinite IEnumerable without using yield with only C# code?
Then this is an elegant solution.
Nov
7
comment Is it possible to implement an infinite IEnumerable without using yield with only C# code?
@svick Does GetConsumingEnumerable consume all the items immediately? Because if it depends on something enumerating the enumerator as fast as your while (true) loop adds them ... when that doesn't happen ... where do those queued items get stored?
Nov
7
comment Is it possible to implement an infinite IEnumerable without using yield with only C# code?
Won't this answer run out of memory fairly quickly? BlockingCollection is new to me, but as best I can tell it's a collection: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd267312.aspx
Nov
7
comment Is it possible to implement an infinite IEnumerable without using yield with only C# code?
@Servy You might want to read a book on LINQ.
Nov
7
comment Is it possible to implement an infinite IEnumerable without using yield with only C# code?
@Den That's not incorrect but it doesn't matter: You can't use the yield keyword directly
Jan
31
comment When to use weak references in .Net?
@JoeDaley I agree. The .NET GC uses a mark and sweep algorithm which (I believe I'm recalling this correctly) marks all objects for collection and then follows references from "roots" (references of objects on the stack, static objects), unmarking objects for collection. If a circular reference exists but none of the objects are accessible from a root, the objects are not unmarked for collection and are thus eligible for collection.
Jan
31
comment When to use weak references in .Net?
I'm a little disappointed this is getting some many votes to close. I wouldn't mind seeing an answer or some discussion about this (in b4 "Stack Overflow is not a forum").
Oct
24
comment “Never do in code what you can get the SQL server to do well for you” - Is this a recipe for a bad design?
@MrEdmundo Take it to meta.