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visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Apr 24 at 1:52

Mar
4
comment Why do Java's Iterator and ListIterator point between elements?
After @kevincline pointed out that Guava has (at least a unidirectional peeking iterator,) I may delete the Google code project, especially if I get an answer to my question about how to peek back or if I get an accepted enhancement request to add this to Guava.
Mar
4
comment Why do Java's Iterator and ListIterator point between elements?
Thanks Kevin! I posted a follow-up question to this on SO: Is it possible to use Guava's ForwardingListIterator with a PeekingIterator?
Mar
3
comment Why do Java's Iterator and ListIterator point between elements?
Now it is. I synchronized every method based on your logic.
Mar
3
comment Why do Java's Iterator and ListIterator point between elements?
If you're interested, see my edit. I implemented and packaged an extension to ArrayList to accomplish this.
Mar
3
comment Why do Java's Iterator and ListIterator point between elements?
So is the issue that one could concurrently remove and access the current element? Wouldn't this be the equivalent issue as concurrently calling next()? remove() would be synchronized as would getCurrent(). Am I missing something?
Oct
19
comment How can I thoroughly evaluate a prospective employer?
I may be in the minority here, but I really don't think the Joel test is by any means sufficient to determine the quality of a workplace. My former employer would have scored pretty well on the Joel test, but was terribly dysfunctional, closed minded, and inefficient.
Jun
29
comment What are the consequences of immutable classes with references to mutable classes?
please correct your answer to reflect the fact that an immutable object can reference mutable objects as long as: 1. The references to its are not leaked; and 2. the immutable object cannot modify the mutable objects after construction. (Java Concurrency in Practice, Section 3.4 Immutability, Goetz2006)
Jun
20
comment Is aspect-oriented programming a misnomer?
Object-oriented analysis and design
Jun
20
comment Is aspect-oriented programming a misnomer?
I think the problem here is that there are many angles that need to be considered during software development: error handling, scope, encapsulation, etc. Each of those narrowly focused dimensions does not constitute its own paradigm or methodology. My question is really trying to uncover, "are aspects a narrow scope" like these features? If so, AOP is misnamed.
Jun
20
comment Is aspect-oriented programming a misnomer?
not that an unsourced Wikipedia sentence is a reliable reference, but it's certainly on par with a collection of unsourced Google results. The first sentence in the Wikipedia article on "programming paradigm" says "A programming paradigm is a fundamental style of computer programming." I believe this is completely consistent with American Heritage dictionary's definition of a paradigm.
Jun
20
comment Is aspect-oriented programming a misnomer?
American Heritage dictionary defines paradigm as "A set of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitutes a way of viewing reality for the community that shares them, especially in an intellectual discipline." Object-oriented programming feels clearly to me like a technique to model reality. In my coding experience, I have yet to find an applicable use case for AOP language support, and as open-minded as I see myself, at this point it appears to me an enormous leap to apply the paradigm label to aspects.
Jun
19
comment What is Object Oriented Programming ill-suited for?
I'm not sure this is a case where OOP is ill suited, but a case where one could "get by" without it.
Jun
19
comment What is Object Oriented Programming ill-suited for?
Object oriented software development does not equal inheritance. The counterexample you provided with rainbow and debt would be implemented by a good Java developer familiar with best practices of OO design and Java would likely implement these common methods with interfaces that describe the common behavior and not inheritance.
Jun
5
comment How can I thoroughly evaluate a prospective employer?
good point, although I can't imagine that if the other questions were well answered, that the same company would fail to recognize that "quality of life" is important to employee satisfaction resulting in higher quality of work. I suppose it couldn't hurt to ask the employees what kinds of hours they work, including how often there is "overtime" or weekend time, and how often they telecommute.
May
31
comment How can I thoroughly evaluate a prospective employer?
I like your questions very much, but I'm not sure what answers I would want to them, and even if I knew, I'm not sure they would be as important as a clearly defined and documented idea of what constitutes well-written software. The answer I'm looking for is the list of "-ilities," understable, maintainable, extendable, etc. How that's implemented will change over time, but the "ilities" should not. If the company values these, and a particular employee doesn't like it, I suppose the answer I'd like to hear is that they would patiently try to convince the employee.
May
31
comment How can I thoroughly evaluate a prospective employer?
I have worked for many companies where the rosy picture painted during the interview is laughable once reality hits. I wouldn't look at it as if the interviewers were outright lying, and give them the benefit of the doubt that they may actually think they were being completely honest with you, but didn't think about things the same way. I think that's probably why it's best to make sure the questions are answered with enough detail that unless they do explicitly lie, you will have a better idea what you might be "in for." I.e., ask them to explain their branching strategy.
May
31
comment How can I thoroughly evaluate a prospective employer?
To me it's less about the specific implementations and more about the culture and how open-minded the organization is and how truly interested they are in continuous improvement of the company as well as the individuals.
May
31
comment How can I thoroughly evaluate a prospective employer?
@Aditya (+1), I agree that it needs to be done carefully, and certainly not all of the questions need to be asked to evaluate the company. Many of the questions may be rendered moot once an answer is given that indicates that a weak area. The questions can also be spread across any phone calls and then spread throughout multiple people that are spoken to at the interview. Incidentally, I am less concerned about "getting the job" unless it's a good match with my values. I think part of getting the right job is working for an open-minded employer who is also honest and forthcoming.
May
30
comment How can I thoroughly evaluate a prospective employer?
@Steven, the set of questions is likely specific to programmers.
May
30
comment How can I thoroughly evaluate a prospective employer?
@Developer, you're right it is essentially the same question, except that it belongs on this site. I'm not sure what the policy is about moving old questions to the new more appropriate sites, but I'm willing to consolidate them if possible.