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bio website fleces.com
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visits member for 1 year, 5 months
seen Feb 27 at 0:36

Professional web developer.

Mostly PHP in client environment, which focuses on custom solutions as well as being forced to use and develop for every rancid CMS system made over the past decade.

Mobile development in Java and Objective C.


Feb
27
comment Able to read Code but struggling majorly to write it
It helps to have a goal. If, for example, you wanted to make a game, you could download a framework or library and follow introductory tutorials. If something less complex, you can begin by searching for examples of these programs, deconstruct them and modify them to fit your needs or interests.
Nov
20
awarded  Yearling
Aug
7
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
I have to write maintainable code all the time. Just in some cases it doesn't have to be. However, I do have plenty of experience so I typically know when and where to cut corners. The point of this post was to just stir up conversation about the threshold of proper and sloppy for whatever purpose. My example only lightly brushes on it since the example given is mostly harmless in a smaller application. However, if I were writing bank software I would never be so careless.
Aug
6
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
I've encountered instances in programming where the code did not need to be maintainable or perform outside the needs. Like kiosk utilities for trade shows or events that are very specific and not likely to be reused. In the case of my own game - I am the only one maintaining it, so that argument may not be the most applicable. I still have doubts about the common perspective on "better programmer" because rigid adherence to guidelines, maintainability and proper usage of datatypes can be enough of a discouragement to not complete the project. If the code works as expected, why perfect it?
Aug
3
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
28
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
Yeah, I am aware but the point of the question is mostly that in the smaller, contained context there doesn't appear to be a reason to be so proper. In all my years of programming, there really hasn't been a whole lot of creeping back to bite us. I doubt that we're so proper. I think it's that languages and expectations change like normal software. Some less than others. But in the end the inefficiency of one project may only be realized when the project is in the past and no longer essential. It makes it hard to justify the headache of being so rigid.
Nov
23
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
Yes, you're right it shouldn't make a difference even if only a little care is placed in its design. But it can make a difference depending on its purpose or if in general its purpose transformed over time and became something it was not intended to be. Seen that before, but I'm just going on a tangent here. To be fair, a product can be high quality without having to be any more than functional.
Nov
23
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
Well, performance was my basis for questioning procedure, not necessarily a concern. I'm not looking to benchmark per say. Merely observing that inefficient code made no performance difference. It is essentially transparent to the user how efficient or inefficient the program was, therefore making the concern for such profiling irrelevant. Granted, I had to have some concern to benchmark in the first place, but it was mostly curiosity. And if the product is finished and it is noticeably slow then yes, a profiler makes sense. Thanks for the link
Nov
23
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
I don't think I agree with that though. In my post I mention no difference in performance. That would suggest there is no average or great product, but an equal balance despite the shortcomings of one. I would agree with your statement, however, if there was a specific project of great importance we were all using as the comparison. But abstractly, the general observation is that in this anonymous project, a decidedly inefficient class performed equally with an optimized one. So then, is it ok to adopt a slack attitude on this or argue for perfection every time?
Nov
23
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
I would say my only concern was that in my tests I noticed no performance differences between the improper and proper use of datatypes for the specified scenario. As in your suggestion, I overloaded the class with more data to see if it was just too little to make a difference. In the end, both performed equally. Granted, I'm just making a basic RPG type game. It's not like banking software or something complex. But it has made me wonder if it would be better for business to not be so proper all the time.
Nov
23
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
I want to say I agree with you but I wouldn't have taken it to such extremes. I don't think one offs are often just spit out, escaping testing or debugging. Just cause it isn't optimized and perfectly designed doesn't make it any less of a product if the performance and stability are not affected by the shortcust. Which is ultimately my point and why I wonder why everyone makes such a stink over coding examples that aren't top of the line. It happens a lot on stackoverflow.
Nov
23
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
@michael - Well, I agree but remember I am only pointing out the items.length loop because I see people harping on iterations like that on stackoverflow like they just insulted mohammad or something. My situation was more of "improper" datatypes.
Nov
22
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
22
awarded  Good Question
Nov
21
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
Sadly there is another one in the not caring to be proper list that many people are blessed to not know: When a client vomits up an old system into your care and tells you they need it done in a week. Sometimes the time and/or budget do not lend themselves to proper coding and your attention on the project is more of a grace than a business transaction. For example, if their code uses largely deprecated methods but needs some patching (speaking in a web scenario). Can't fix the whole thing. Must get dirty.
Nov
21
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
Heh, no I didn't think you were telling me off. I was just being communicative. I asked this question for a reason and I'm glad this many people responded without voting it closed.
Nov
21
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
21
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
Additionally, my idea of "proper" programming is a culmination of the repetetive opinions of the stackoverflow community, as well as the collection of programmers that have come and gone at the firm I work for. Some with CI degrees, some self taught. There is a common opinion to base things off of and I tend to agree with what everyone says collectively before just deciding that one way is right and one way is wrong. Thanks for participating.
Nov
21
comment When does “proper” programming no longer matter?
I wouldn't say I prefer the second. Someone edited my post to remove the part about my making this android game almost entirely drunk (just for fun) and as a result I am surprised to see my drunken choices made no difference on performance. I replaced some weird classes with proper ones to test. I do agree though that knowing the rules exist is more important than knowing what the rules are...
Nov
21
awarded  Commentator