320 reputation
112
bio website google.com/search?q=recursion
location Washington
age 29
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen yesterday

I make stuff people can't touch using tools most of them don't understand.

combined Stack Exchange profile for jzx


May
22
comment Sharing source code of my online game?
I suggest migrating this to gamedev.stackexchange.com
May
22
suggested suggested edit on Do activity diagrams always end in one endpoint?
May
22
comment Measuring “novelty” of data
While not ideal, I think this is a good enough starting point.
May
22
awarded  Scholar
May
22
accepted Measuring “novelty” of data
May
22
comment Didn't do too well on a Java IKM test, advice?
You might try actually writing things like a compiler and a garbage collector. Not for any specific purpose, but to stretch your mind and give you a sense of what kinds of things need to be taken into account. Trying to do something will help you remember, or at least guess, at the fine details.
May
22
comment Why is there no deterministic object destruction in Java?
The point is that running out of memory should be an edge case, not something you have to worry about all the time. Unless you're working with extremely large amounts or sizes of data, memory requirements shouldn't even enter into your mind.
May
22
comment Why is there no deterministic object destruction in Java?
@Doval Yes, in practice there's no such thing as infinite memory. But the goal is to allow things to be compressed, moved, removed, or recycled without interrupting the programmer's intention for writing the application. When someone writes a program without garbage collection, they also need to write a memory manager that will not only be mixed in with the business logic of their code but is likely to be much less effective than one that can adapt to conditions at runtime. So instead we act as if there is unlimited memory and handle runout as an exceptional case.
May
22
comment Why is there no deterministic object destruction in Java?
@Doval Yes, if you run out of memory then you're out. But we shouldn't need to worry about how much memory we have, because the available memory is something that can be optimized at runtime according to system state. For example, in a variation of GC, large underutilized objects could be jogged to slower media depending on usage to make room for new objects, and then restored to faster media when necessary. It just so happens that (in normal GC) unused objects are moved to oblivion, and sometimes we recreate them exactly the same when needed.
May
22
comment Why is there no deterministic object destruction in Java?
@Andris Yes, as I said the GC must know when an object has the potential of being called on again in order to prevent "programmer forgot X was still in use" errors. Object pooling is something that has to be programmed, using things like weak references and such. By indicating to the GC that objects may be reused, the GC can still dispose of them if it needs the space or they can be rehydrated and strongly referenced again without incurring an allocation cost.
May
21
answered In voice recognition programs, what methods are generally used to separate voice from noise?
May
21
awarded  Yearling
May
21
answered Why is there no deterministic object destruction in Java?
Apr
8
answered What is the difference between an array and a vector?
Apr
8
awarded  Critic
Feb
14
revised Measuring “novelty” of data
extra word
Feb
14
revised Measuring “novelty” of data
more precise wording
Feb
14
revised Measuring “novelty” of data
added 559 characters in body
Feb
14
comment Measuring “novelty” of data
Possibly, although that leads me to wonder about how white noise would be treated. If the stream is just totally random, ie incompressible in the usual sense, then my definition for novelty would fall apart. Taken as a whole, there would be nothing statistically significant about the stream, but sections of the frame could appear to be very "novel."
Feb
14
awarded  Student