153 reputation
17
bio website
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Nov 3 '13 at 21:03

addicted c# newbie [+ learning VB.Net]

VBA / sql / SSRS / some MDX


Jun
21
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
14
revised From an execution perspective is an interpreter the same as the JVM / or the .net Framework
edited title
Oct
14
comment From an execution perspective is an interpreter the same as the JVM / or the .net Framework
+1 ok - thanks: lots more information. Intrigued by this snippet Compilers don't have to go to machine language. C is a popular target for experimental languages .... so C is sort of built in to most computers? Then some languages have been designed to simply get interpreted into C?
Oct
14
awarded  Commentator
Oct
14
comment From an execution perspective is an interpreter the same as the JVM / or the .net Framework
+1 thanks for this information - the history of the evolution of these modes helps to understand the current situation.
Oct
14
comment From an execution perspective is an interpreter the same as the JVM / or the .net Framework
+1 this is excellent and a description I suspect I'll be re-visiting in the future. Before jitters did languages compile their programs direct to machine code, or was there originally just interpreters? ...ok- just reading @Kaydell's answer which is helping me with the evolution aspect.
Oct
14
revised From an execution perspective is an interpreter the same as the JVM / or the .net Framework
added 2 characters in body
Oct
12
comment From an execution perspective is an interpreter the same as the JVM / or the .net Framework
@MartijnPieters I've attempted to edit the OP as "framework" was the wrong term to use. Do you now get the gist of my question? Does it need further edits?
Oct
12
revised From an execution perspective is an interpreter the same as the JVM / or the .net Framework
edited title
Oct
12
comment From an execution perspective is an interpreter the same as the JVM / or the .net Framework
Will try to edit: had a feeling I was probably not far enough into the subject to try to post this question. In layman's terms I thought python uses an "interpreter" and java uses a "framework"?
Oct
12
revised From an execution perspective is an interpreter the same as the JVM / or the .net Framework
added 150 characters in body
Oct
12
asked From an execution perspective is an interpreter the same as the JVM / or the .net Framework
Sep
3
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
20
comment Is it a row or a record (or a tuple)
[@CodeWorks ...I'm just arguing for arguments sake now; am pretty happy to conclude that I'll not use field/record in the future whereas I will use row and tuple(especially in MDX)]
Aug
20
comment Is it a row or a record (or a tuple)
@CodeWorks - that wikipedia page you referenced seems to use tuple AND row - that reference doesn't prove one is more academic than the other term.
Aug
20
revised Is it a row or a record (or a tuple)
edited title
Aug
20
comment Is it a row or a record (or a tuple)
@CodeWorks ...hmmmmmmmmmmm...need a cup of coffee now. "Row" can be an academic term. A tuple is a set of values.
Aug
20
awarded  Teacher
Aug
20
comment Is it a row or a record (or a tuple)
+1 agree with your first comment but it seems like most programming communication involves being precise with language so I find it strange that for such an important object people are suddenly very forgiving. If I said "that dynamic language named after the English seventies comedy" you might understand that I mean Python, but why should I not just say "Python" (...not the best example I know but hopefully you see what I mean!)
Aug
19
comment Is it a row or a record (or a tuple)
(I don't mind getting down-voted: but when I down-vote a question I generally explain why the the poster as it helps them to edit the question and improve their future questions)