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Jun
29
comment “Don't do programming after a few years of starting career”. Is this a fair advice?
Death marches may be the norm in your part of the programming industry, but there are plenty of places where work-life balance is valued.
Apr
15
answered Can a CS degree benefit an older programmer?
Apr
15
comment Can a CS degree benefit an older programmer?
Many employers will reimburse you for a part-time degree, at least up to several thousand annually. That makes it totally worth it. I made having that benefit a condition of taking the jobs I've taken so far.
Apr
14
answered New to a project , how to deal with it?
Apr
8
comment Is it bad that you don't program on your spare time while at uni?
Do those "rockstars" that you know do interesting things outside of work? Read good books, challenge themselves athletically, etc? I bet that contributes way more than you'd think to their ability to program well. Over the years I've come to have a great deal of respect for the well-rounded programmer as a programmer as well as a person.
Apr
8
comment Is it bad that you don't program on your spare time while at uni?
I was a CS and English writing double major who usually had more stories than programming ideas in my head. These days I have a lot more apps I'd like to write than stories floating around in my head. And I wouldn't mind if the situation reversed itself again. Being broadly interested/interesting should not be undervalued.
Apr
8
comment Is it bad that you don't program on your spare time while at uni?
"There is no question, that the more time you spend refining your skill as a programmer the better you will be out of the gate once you graduate." - there is, however, a point of diminishing returns.
Mar
18
comment Is type safety worth the trade-offs?
"Working quickly can catch up with you if you're not careful." Something that has bit me before for sure.
Mar
14
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Mar
9
comment And if I ask the job interviewer for reasons to join the company?
The interviewer also might be completely different from you as a developer. What he loves about a job may be that he has nearly total autonomy while you value learning through collaboration with your team. Knowing that all he does is sit in his office without team interaction and he thinks that's awesome is valuable.
Mar
9
comment And if I ask the job interviewer for reasons to join the company?
@crosenblum - doing research is great (and expected). That doesn't mean you don't want to ask the developers what, in their eyes, makes their job valuable. As an interviewer I appreciate that question - it shows the applicant is interested in making a match not just getting any job.
Mar
9
comment And if I ask the job interviewer for reasons to join the company?
Beyond the definition of benefits as I normally think of them (paid vacation, health care, 401(k) and match, etc), you want to look into the company culture as a fit. Asking "What do you like about your day-to-day job?" and "Do you have a typical day? What does it look like for you?" are ways to help assess that uqestion.