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visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Jan 2 '12 at 15:18

Jun
29
comment “Don't do programming after a few years of starting career”. Is this a fair advice?
Death marches may be the norm in your part of the programming industry, but there are plenty of places where work-life balance is valued.
Apr
15
comment Can a CS degree benefit an older programmer?
Many employers will reimburse you for a part-time degree, at least up to several thousand annually. That makes it totally worth it. I made having that benefit a condition of taking the jobs I've taken so far.
Apr
8
comment Is it bad that you don't program on your spare time while at uni?
Do those "rockstars" that you know do interesting things outside of work? Read good books, challenge themselves athletically, etc? I bet that contributes way more than you'd think to their ability to program well. Over the years I've come to have a great deal of respect for the well-rounded programmer as a programmer as well as a person.
Apr
8
comment Is it bad that you don't program on your spare time while at uni?
I was a CS and English writing double major who usually had more stories than programming ideas in my head. These days I have a lot more apps I'd like to write than stories floating around in my head. And I wouldn't mind if the situation reversed itself again. Being broadly interested/interesting should not be undervalued.
Apr
8
comment Is it bad that you don't program on your spare time while at uni?
"There is no question, that the more time you spend refining your skill as a programmer the better you will be out of the gate once you graduate." - there is, however, a point of diminishing returns.
Apr
6
comment Events where junior-level developer/CS student can prove himself?
@Nordvind - perhaps not, but I've been part of an interview team that hired a rising sophomore before. The reason she was hired was largely because she knew the hiring manager who was willing to pull for her. She did a great job.
Mar
23
comment Feeling of Despair before programming?
Do you not feel mastery and a sense of accomplishment with each finished assignment? Can you not focus on that instead of the worry of the next assignment? Programming isn't always going to be easy and you won't always feel like a master, but once you've slogged through a tough problem you should have that feeling of victory.
Mar
18
comment Is type safety worth the trade-offs?
"Working quickly can catch up with you if you're not careful." Something that has bit me before for sure.
Mar
9
comment What's the best way to recruit talented female developers?
It's important for men to have that too. Plenty of men in my office make it known that they aren't available to work excessive hours unless under extreme and rare conditions because they want to go home to be with their wives and young kids.
Mar
9
comment And if I ask the job interviewer for reasons to join the company?
The interviewer also might be completely different from you as a developer. What he loves about a job may be that he has nearly total autonomy while you value learning through collaboration with your team. Knowing that all he does is sit in his office without team interaction and he thinks that's awesome is valuable.
Mar
9
comment And if I ask the job interviewer for reasons to join the company?
@crosenblum - doing research is great (and expected). That doesn't mean you don't want to ask the developers what, in their eyes, makes their job valuable. As an interviewer I appreciate that question - it shows the applicant is interested in making a match not just getting any job.
Mar
9
comment And if I ask the job interviewer for reasons to join the company?
Beyond the definition of benefits as I normally think of them (paid vacation, health care, 401(k) and match, etc), you want to look into the company culture as a fit. Asking "What do you like about your day-to-day job?" and "Do you have a typical day? What does it look like for you?" are ways to help assess that uqestion.
Feb
23
comment What would you say to a bunch of software engineering students on their first day at college?
Ring by spring pressure doesn't do the dating scene in college any good.
Feb
17
comment career advice for PhD scientist seeking to program?
Definitely look into Computational Biology
Feb
11
comment Are the National Computer Science Academy certifications worth it?
So I'm not the only one who saw the name of the certification and went, "huh?"
Feb
8
comment Is C++ suitable as a first language?
@luis.espinal - maybe it was just me, but C-style C++ at 14 (even with recursion and simple pointer arithmetic and memory management) was nothing on the pain of Lisp at 17.
Feb
7
comment Is C++ suitable as a first language?
This is the answer I would give as well - I think a lot of people answering here are forgetting the simple stuff you can do with "C with Classes" that has nothing to do with any of the hard stuff. It is about as easy to print out the sum of two numbers to the console in C++ as in Java.
Feb
7
comment Is C++ suitable as a first language?
Functional programming twists your brain - I know MIT starts out with Scheme pretty early on, but I am glad I wasn't started on functional programming until after two years of a hybrid proceedural/OO-style in school.
Feb
7
comment Is C++ suitable as a first language?
My first C++ program (which was my first programming experience) was simply typing out what was given to me on a sheet of paper. I learned the programming concepts later. It wasn't until working professionally with C++ that I began to understand some of the intricacies, but that didn't matter at the time. My teacher taught around the hardest stuff and we still learned flow control, input-output, the basics of pointers, and recursion.
Feb
7
comment Is C++ suitable as a first language?
C++ (taught C-style) was my first language at 14. I wouldn't recommend teaching the intricacies of templates to college students, but certainly it's do-able.