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12h
comment Why do so many languages restrict string literals to a single source line?
@cat I also addressed the idea of having the different preprocessor design. Try reading the answer completely before commenting (and voting)
12h
answered Why do so many languages restrict string literals to a single source line?
Jan
27
comment Should we avoid language features that C++ has but Java doesn't to increase maintainability?
I think there's already a question or two around here covering the FQA and correctness thereof. I can help look in a couple hours.
Jan
27
comment Should we avoid language features that C++ has but Java doesn't to increase maintainability?
The FQA author definitely falls into the "understand at most 20% of the language" group. Quite a few answers there that are factually wrong, and a whole bunch more that just miss the point, illustrated with strawman after strawman.
Jan
21
comment If I use locks, can my algorithm still be lock-free?
@supercat: That's pretty much what I said.
Jan
21
comment If I use locks, can my algorithm still be lock-free?
@Panzercrisis: So you think it is "Do what it wants, excluding acquiring any other lock"? That still doesn't meet any of the progress conditions, because you could begin waiting for I/O or any other condition that needs to be triggered by another thread waiting for the lock you are holding. "Do what you want" while holding a lock is a recipe for disaster.
Jan
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
6
comment Should I avoid using unsigned int in C#?
@NathanCooper: ... "can't call APIs that use them from some other languages". The metadata for them is standardized, so all .NET languages that DO support unsigned types will interoperate just fine.
Dec
17
revised How to refer to ByRef and ByVal in a dropdown label?
added 31 characters in body
Dec
17
answered How to refer to ByRef and ByVal in a dropdown label?
Dec
14
comment Isn't the use of pointer variables a memory overhead?
That clarification looks good.
Dec
14
comment Isn't the use of pointer variables a memory overhead?
(Blog post showing the performance benefit: blog.juma.me.uk/tag/compressed-oops)
Dec
14
comment Isn't the use of pointer variables a memory overhead?
"measly 8 megabytes" is the typical size of the entire L3 cache on a modern CPU
Dec
14
comment Isn't the use of pointer variables a memory overhead?
@ErikEidt: Actually, one JVM got a rather significant performance boost when they recognized the wastefulness of full-sized 64-bit pointers and switched to using indexes instead.
Nov
16
awarded  Yearling
Nov
10
comment Maintain hundreds of customized branches over master branch
I'm going to disagree in one substantial way: Configuration doesn't have to come from a data file, as this answer suggests. It can be performed by code callbacks (think Form.Load event in C#). The important thing is that the customizations are (1) stored separately from the main logic, and (2) interact with a fairly stable public interface of the main logic. The rest of the guidance is perfect.
Oct
14
revised Is it normal to spend as much, if not more, time writing tests than actual code?
This is the actual meaning, as revealed in comments and the footnote
Oct
9
comment Should UDP data payloads include a CRC?
It attempts to ensure that messages are unchanged, but the checksum used in UDP is rather weak. While the chance of a random message having a valid checksum is indeed 1 in 65536 for all 16-bit checksums, the more useful measures involve detectable number of bit flips arranged either randomly or in a burst, and all checksums do not perform equally according to this metric.
Oct
8
comment Does C# 6.0's new null-conditional operator go against the Law of Demeter?
@Telastyn: The new language syntax we are talking about does support method calls: a?.Func1(x)?.Func2(y) The null coalescing operator is something else.
Oct
2
comment Why don't languages include implication as a logical operator?
This works in C and C++ as well.