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location Winston-Salem, NC
age 32
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I am a developer specializing in web applications. Currently, I work on a large application built on Java, JRuby, and Rails. I've also written web services in Python using Django and the combination of Pyramid and Cornice. I am interested in practical programming education, service-oriented architecture and design, and functional programming. My current personal interest is Clojure.


Mar
20
awarded  Curious
Feb
2
comment RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
No. You're still redirecting to a partner-controlled URL. Redirecting has advantages, but you must still redirect to something; and my answer covers how that something is to be generated.
Feb
2
comment RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
@Hey: The problem in the original question is, "How do you include the [partner's] URL in an email?" My question answers that by explaining how to generate a URL based on the partner's settings. Your answer simply says to redirect from the API endpoint to that URL; you still have to generate a URL, the same as if you were putting it in an email. It does not solve the problem stated in the question, but changes the location where it occurs.
Feb
2
revised RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
added 1 character in body
Feb
2
comment RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
Yes, but that's exactly the same that I told you to do in my answer. It just relocates it from being in the email to being in a redirect.
Feb
2
comment RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
How are you going to redirect to a path specific to each email? Either you need to communicate the request I'd, or the client's redirect will be the same for everyone.
Feb
1
comment RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Feb
1
comment RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
@Gaz_Edge, I have added an example to the answer.
Feb
1
revised RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
Adding an example.
Feb
1
comment RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
Who is the entity which owns this URL in your original question? => http://client.com/dashboard/{business_name}/enquiries/{enquiry_id}
Feb
1
revised RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
adding more concrete details
Feb
1
revised RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
deleted 10 characters in body
Feb
1
comment RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
These are very standard industry terms. "You" is taken to mean your team or your company; thus "URLs you control" means URLs that point to your application (where application means the code that you're asking a question about). "Client" is a bad term, because it has a specific meaning in API terms; I have changed that to "partner" throughout, and it refers to the other company (whose emails you are sending).
Feb
1
answered RESTful Api: Send email with links to client URL
Jan
22
revised Why was Scala not implemented with C or C++
grammar
Jan
18
answered Meaning of an “instance of a database”
Jan
12
answered How would a modern website like Reddit divide up its website into Django apps?
Jan
11
comment How do I avoid cascading refactorings?
If I am refactoring a heavily used interface, I add a shim. This shim handles the defaulting, so that legacy calls continue to work. I work on the interface behind the shim, then, when I am done with it, I begin to change classes to use the interface again instead of the shim.
Jan
11
comment How do I avoid cascading refactorings?
Your question is, "how do I avoid this [failure] in the future?" The answer is that, even if you currently "have" CI and tests, you are not applying them correctly. I haven't had a compile error that lasted more than ten minutes in years, because I view compiling as "the first unit test," and when it is broken, I fix it, because I need to be able to see tests passing as I am working further on the code.
Jan
11
comment How do I avoid cascading refactorings?
But your code base should never get to the point where it can't compile. You should be running your tests constantly, and the moment you can't, you have a broken situation and need to fix it. One form of "broken build" is "I can't even run the tests," and you should never continue working until that situation is fixed. Read about Continuous Integration.