1,577 reputation
614
bio website appogenic.com
location Phoenix, AZ
age
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Nov 18 at 0:01

From the beginning of personal computing Matthew Frederick has been focused on how people experience its empowering integration of art and engineering. On the right-brain he’s been successful in print, web, and interactive media graphic design, and from the left-brain, both low- and high-level programming and database design and development. Where those come together with human users, Matthew has worked at the forefront of user experience and interactivity design, beginning with early CD-ROM "multimedia" through the lifetime of the web, the heyday of PDAs and pre-iPhone smartphones, to today's cutting-edge phones and tablets.

After working with hundreds of clients, from small startups to Fortune 100 companies, he has also become proficient at transforming a project’s requirements into efficiently buildable technical specifications while translating its implementation challenges and options into a easily-understood concepts for those less technically-minded. His experience includes working solo and in small teams, as well as leading a hundred consultants, designers, developers, and managers in building multi-phase, multi-million dollar projects.


Nov
21
awarded  Yearling
Nov
21
awarded  Yearling
Aug
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
11
comment Are There Any Programming Focused Notebooks?
@PatrickHughes Self-created evidence for your own case with no third-party verification should pretty much always be ignored by juries and judges, no? Isn't that just pure "he said, she said"?
Mar
7
awarded  Pundit
Nov
21
awarded  Yearling
Jan
21
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
21
awarded  Yearling
Sep
9
comment “Do you have any questions for us?” In an interview
@jk In an ideal interview, yeah. I didn't have many of those.
May
27
comment How much risk is involved to launch a smartphone application initially for non iOS phone? What are the advantages?
As to length, we can agree to disagree about how much of an issue 1-2 days is. On the timing, it comes from my experience and that of the many developers I know, as well as those in my user group. Though Apple doesn't publicize it, the more apps or updates you submit over time, the shorter the update approval process becomes for all of your app updates, and to a lesser extent even new apps (generally, though certain things can push that back out to the normal average). A built-up trust thing, I suppose.
May
27
comment How much risk is involved to launch a smartphone application initially for non iOS phone? What are the advantages?
FWIW, the initial iOS App Store review process does take 5-7 business days, which isn't very long. Update reviews usually only take 1-2 days, making frequent updates plenty easy.
May
24
comment Do we actually have to pay to make Windows Phone, Android, or iPhone apps?
@vartec It's completely relevant and the math's not hard. 1: Sometime this year there will be more Android apps than iOS apps, it's inevitable at their current growth rates, and they're nearly at parity now. 1: Total iOS app revenues are way, way higher than total Android revenues. 1 + 1 = 2: Each iOS app generates more revenue than each Android app. They're not different concepts, they must both be considered to determine which platform makes the most money per app. But seriously, and again, can you point to anything that indicates Android development is more profitable for a developer?
May
23
comment Do we actually have to pay to make Windows Phone, Android, or iPhone apps?
@vartec You're right, that's ads, only one way apps make money. As I mentioned, there are lots of solid sources showing actual and projected app sales revenues, with iOS utterly trouncing Android. Gartner: j.mp/ltdQux -- IHS ScreenDigest: j.mp/jxjGR2 -- iSuppli: j.mp/mUznKe -- Feel free to provide your own sources that say otherwise.
May
23
comment Do we actually have to pay to make Windows Phone, Android, or iPhone apps?
@vartec I suspect you didn't look at the article. Total revenue including all of those Android phones has iOS making more. As to it being more expensive to develop and maintain iOS apps, how so? The Apple dev program is $65 more expensive, so that's a restaurant meal or two, but how are they more expensive to maintain?
May
23
comment Do we actually have to pay to make Windows Phone, Android, or iPhone apps?
@vartec Comparative market share does not automatically scale with app profitability. This recent chunk of statistics, for example, shows Android phones at nearly double iOS phones but Android app revenue at 78% of iOS: j.mp/kH7sgR -- there are many similar stats from the last couple of months. iOS users still buy more apps and pay more money for them, to a degree where it meaningfully overcomes phone count. Mind you, though, that revenue parity is likely coming soon, or at least closing to a point where it doesn't matter as much.
May
23
comment Do we actually have to pay to make Windows Phone, Android, or iPhone apps?
@Steve Yeah, the OP is below in comments.
May
23
comment Do we actually have to pay to make Windows Phone, Android, or iPhone apps?
@Mike You're still getting the unlimited hosting service, online development support, two direct technical support instances, IDE & compiler, etc. It's 99 lousy bucks.
May
23
comment Do we actually have to pay to make Windows Phone, Android, or iPhone apps?
You're complaining that it costs anything for the publishing, but you do understand that in the case of all three they're hosting the app or apps for you, paying for 100% of the bandwidth of people downloading them. Yeah, if 10 people download your single app then it's not ideal, but if you get a million downloads each of 5 free apps it's an amazing bargain. And those prices stay the same if you make $10k from ads that year, or whatever. It's hella reasonable, imo.
May
19
comment How do I give a free copy of my iPhone app?
+1 Free promo codes are good for this kind of thing but now have the limitation that people who got the app through a promo code cannot rate or review it. This seems to be in response to the promo code exchange sites that started popping up. If you want the person to be able to rate it you can instead send the app as a gift through iTunes -- you'll pay the full amount up front but will get 70% of it back at the end of the month. Alternately you can hand out iTunes Gift Cards but the denominations are often too big and the receiver can buy anything with them (and not buy your app).
May
19
answered programming on handheld devices