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Nov
21
awarded  Yearling
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Aug
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
11
comment Are There Any Programming Focused Notebooks?
@PatrickHughes Self-created evidence for your own case with no third-party verification should pretty much always be ignored by juries and judges, no? Isn't that just pure "he said, she said"?
Mar
7
awarded  Pundit
Nov
21
awarded  Yearling
Jan
21
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
21
awarded  Yearling
Sep
9
comment “Do you have any questions for us?” In an interview
@jk In an ideal interview, yeah. I didn't have many of those.
May
27
comment How much risk is involved to launch a smartphone application initially for non iOS phone? What are the advantages?
As to length, we can agree to disagree about how much of an issue 1-2 days is. On the timing, it comes from my experience and that of the many developers I know, as well as those in my user group. Though Apple doesn't publicize it, the more apps or updates you submit over time, the shorter the update approval process becomes for all of your app updates, and to a lesser extent even new apps (generally, though certain things can push that back out to the normal average). A built-up trust thing, I suppose.
May
27
comment How much risk is involved to launch a smartphone application initially for non iOS phone? What are the advantages?
FWIW, the initial iOS App Store review process does take 5-7 business days, which isn't very long. Update reviews usually only take 1-2 days, making frequent updates plenty easy.
May
19
comment How do I give a free copy of my iPhone app?
+1 Free promo codes are good for this kind of thing but now have the limitation that people who got the app through a promo code cannot rate or review it. This seems to be in response to the promo code exchange sites that started popping up. If you want the person to be able to rate it you can instead send the app as a gift through iTunes -- you'll pay the full amount up front but will get 70% of it back at the end of the month. Alternately you can hand out iTunes Gift Cards but the denominations are often too big and the receiver can buy anything with them (and not buy your app).
May
19
answered programming on handheld devices
May
17
comment I need a true random number generator web service
@Pacerier You're right that "easy" is a matter of perspective. This method is easy if you have access to your server and finding a suitable webcam doesn't take long -- a $10 "buy it now" on ebay, say. That leaves attaching the camera; downloading, compiling, and running the free software; and adding a call to the service in your code. Not trivial, but pretty easy, extremely inexpensive, and provides an unlimited number of requests.
May
17
comment I need a true random number generator web service
@Darknight As David notes, whether or not the numbers eventually fit a normal distribution doesn't affect the randomness. If you're interested in what is required to make a random number generator cryptographically sound (or crypto strong), the LavaRnd guys have a ton of "stat nerd" info and links on their site, along with how they relate to LavaRnd.
May
17
answered I need a true random number generator web service
May
15
comment Pragma Mark in Cocoa
@Zac Not a lot of standard methods, but in Xcode 4 if you use #pragma mark - My Cool Section, the hyphen right there will make Xcode display a horizontal line in the menu, under which will be (in this example) My Cool Section.
May
12
comment Why aren't young programmers interested in mainframes?
@Aaronaught I agree that you can get out and that it won't ruin your career forever, nothing that hyperbolic. I do argue that it would make you less competitive, and that to most modern employers it wouldn't help your career much more than other thinking jobs -- I didn't use "landscaping" as an example, I used jobs that require thinking.
May
12
comment Why aren't young programmers interested in mainframes?
@Aaronaught In a competitive IT world if you spent the couple of years it would take to actually come up to the beginnings of reasonable speed in mainframes, you wouldn't lose your previous skills but you'd automatically be less appealing when looking for other work, just like if you'd spent two years doing forestry or managing a Starbucks: looking like you're out of the loop even a little bit does you no favors when being compared to someone who doesn't look that way.
May
12
comment Why aren't young programmers interested in mainframes?
+1 and well put. I was learning mainframe programming in college 27 years ago and bailed after a couple of years because I could see the microcomputer future springing up all around me. I figured there was no possible way mainframes would still be around in 2011, which makes it impossible to imagine a 20-year old me today thinking there was any future in them.