354 reputation
211
bio website vermiculus.github.io
location Maryland
age 21
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen Sep 13 at 20:00

A computer scientist at heart with a conviction for deduction.

I'm a poor mathematician but pretty decent with TeX. Let me return the favor!

TeX.SE rules.

Check out my blog over on @GitHub! It has (or will have) a lot of good resources:

  • StackExchange markdown reference (to link; things like explicit syntax highlighting and a short rundown of markdown)
  • Recommended TeX resources and editors

Insanely curious, slightly snarky, and a little absent-minded.

Recommended resources:

Recommended editors:


Jul
23
awarded  Autobiographer
Mar
1
awarded  Yearling
Jul
30
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
29
comment Optimal Data Structure for our own API
@kevincline No, the idea is that it will just do utilitarian tasks: local question archival; advanced code editing (bopping out to the right major mode, similar to org); inserting <!-- language: blah> where necessary (depending on the mode that code editing was done in); stuff like that. See the README on GitHub for more info, and feel most welcome to suggest features. The more I know about this before hand, the better it can be designed. edit not to mention emacs keybindings ;)
Jul
29
comment Optimal Data Structure for our own API
@jozefg I really want it too—this internship has sucked up most of my time, but once school starts up some more progress should be made.
Jul
28
comment Why aren't plain-text markup languages (like LaTeX or Markdown) more popular in the software development process?
Oh hi, @MartinSchröder :-) As for WordPad, while most of the content writers may not know how to use MS Word to its full 'potential', a few of them do. From my experience, it is a small set of power-users who set up a document (over and over again) for the users who actually add the bulk of the content. When someone wants to add a figure, a comment is added. (Maintenance of the document as a document, then, becomes at least a part-time job.)
Jul
23
comment Why aren't plain-text markup languages (like LaTeX or Markdown) more popular in the software development process?
@rath Absolutely. If anyone is hoping to bring some young minds to the dark side, the comments/answers to the linked should help get you started. (Especially Jubobs' presentation --- he uploaded an archive of it and it's very good.)
Jul
23
comment Why aren't plain-text markup languages (like LaTeX or Markdown) more popular in the software development process?
@rath Yeah, but Jubobs' presentation unfortunately didn't receive the reception he was going for - only a quarter of the people said they'd take a serious look at it. I can tell that it would be nearly impossible to port even a medium-sized company over to text-based formats.
Jul
23
awarded  Good Question
Jul
17
awarded  Teacher
Jul
17
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
17
comment Why aren't plain-text markup languages (like LaTeX or Markdown) more popular in the software development process?
And to those who say plain text formats become very ugly very quickly, when's the last time you kept your mathematics library code in the same file as your graphics library? or so with your game engine, or map-rendering engine? Such organization exists with plain-text formats that isn't so obvious or clear-cut with binary formats.
Jul
17
comment Why aren't plain-text markup languages (like LaTeX or Markdown) more popular in the software development process?
And as far as the UI being intuitive, this is true for a good chunk of the cliche-level-of-normal workflow, but breaks down for anything more complex. See superuser.com/questions/620454 and also note that the way to update a TOC is to insert a new one in the middle of it and wait for the popup. The way to persistently ignore spelling for a chunk of text is to set the language<-null. Is any of this intuitive? But this is besides the point. Plain-text completely exposes the structure and content of the document; no mess, no fuss.
Jul
17
comment Why aren't plain-text markup languages (like LaTeX or Markdown) more popular in the software development process?
They know what a text file is. Going through the TeXbook has taught me that literally any 'format' (eg markdown) can be TeX'd. Thus, the learning curve (even though I never noticed one with LaTeX) is moot.
Jul
17
answered Git-friendly spreadsheet format?
Jul
17
accepted Why aren't plain-text markup languages (like LaTeX or Markdown) more popular in the software development process?
Jul
17
asked Why aren't plain-text markup languages (like LaTeX or Markdown) more popular in the software development process?
Jul
5
comment What markup languages are good for programming articles/tutorials?
I'd recommend using a dedicated LaTeX editor, but you can choose whatever you're most comfortable with. TeXMaker is a popular choice, as is TUG's TeXworks, but given TeX's age, the kings supreme are still Vim and Emacs. Through a graphical interface, Emacs isn't that bad, but that is another topic entirely ;) cf tex.stackexchange.com/questions/339/latex-editors-ides
Jul
5
comment What markup languages are good for programming articles/tutorials?
@Vilx- Technically, LaTeX does not handle Unicode (by default, there are packages you can load to support them, ie fontspec and inputenc), but the stable fork XeLaTeX does. I was rushing per company when I wrote this, so I'll be improving this answer soon via edit.
Jul
4
comment What markup languages are good for programming articles/tutorials?
Through the listings package yes, but see my actual answer.