1,299 reputation
1813
bio website
location
age
visits member for 4 years
seen Dec 8 at 22:33

Feb
10
comment What skills are needed for machine learning jobs?
Downvoted because that's a horribly dense book for a beginner. The "Data Mining" book by the Weka authors is more appropriate.
Dec
25
comment research papers vs books
It varies tremendously by topic. Some Wikipedia articles are exhaustive, while others are not. Just dive in and start reading. And then once you've become one of the world's leading experts in your field, go back and edit the Wikipedia article with references to help others out.
Dec
25
comment research papers vs books
@AmirNasr: Certainly books can cite and paraphrase material from earlier research papers. Any graduate-level textbook will typically contain dozens or hundreds of references to papers. Regarding Wikipedia, I have not found it to be as comprehensive for specific topics as a dedicated books. The most technical and single-topic-specific books are from Springer, as those books seem to be generally written by PhD-educated professors or researchers.
Nov
14
comment Simplified knapsack in PHP
You need to fully specify the parameters of the problem. Are the parameters: total length of the text; the number of words; the length of each word; the number of lines; the number of characters per line? Are these all parameters?
Nov
11
comment What's the best way to learn image processing?
This is not a helpful list at all. These are all just links to generic online university courses.
Nov
7
comment What to do with a 7 button mouse as a programmer?
Do you have 7 fingers?
Oct
30
comment Algorithm refresher. Why is heapsort an insort algorithm?
I would highly recommend you purchase the book "Introduction to Algorithms" by Cormen, et al. It clearly answers all algorithm-related questions. If you are serious about a career as a computer scientist or software engineer, then you need to have this book.
Oct
30
comment Algorithm refresher. Why is heapsort an insort algorithm?
This is not a useful reply. It has nothing to do with heapsort and does not answer the question.
Sep
21
comment How is IETF different from W3C?
@ZJR: OSI layer 3 is the networking layer, e.g. IP and IPX. It is NOT tightly coupled with layers 1 and 2. As I said, go read a good book before mouthing off like that. You don't see the rest of us going to a surgery message board and talking nonsense about appendectomies.
Sep
21
comment How is IETF different from W3C?
@ZJR: There isn't 'deeply rooted oversensitivity'. You simply don't know what you're talking about. Go read a good book on networking rather than talking out of your rear end.
Aug
31
comment Are the different available programming languages redundant?
I know, right? Why do we need any new programming languages when there's already HTML?
Mar
9
comment What kind of screen has the best image quality for reading/programming?
It's spelled 'matte', not 'matt'.
Feb
19
comment Which hashing algorithm is best for uniqueness and speed?
what is the input to your hash function? A simple byte array?
Feb
19
comment Why are SW engineering interviews disproportionately difficult (vs. research interviews)?
I kind of get what you're saying. The right kind of interview should fit the right kind of job? Is that a correct interpretation?
Feb
17
comment Career advice: PhD in theory of programming languages
@ Paul. Aren't you going to crow some more about how much an MS makes over a PhD?
Feb
16
comment Career advice: PhD in theory of programming languages
@ Paul. I'm not stupid enough to post my name. But I can say that I graduated in 2004 from a top-20 U.S. grad school with a PhD in CS. During that time, I was making $25K as a grad student. In my first job, I was making 95K, and six years later I'm making $148K. Most of my friends who graduated with an M.S. at the same time in the same field are making substantially less. My other PhD friends all across the country are at Google, Microsoft, etc. making about the same as me. Go to glassdoor.com and do some of your own damn homework.
Feb
16
comment Career advice: PhD in theory of programming languages
@ Paul. You seriously need to do more investigation into this topic before you spread more misinformation. I see from your profile that you are still a grad student, so you are underqualified to answer this question. I have a CS PhD and have worked in industry as both a researcher and as a SW engineer at Major Search Engine Companies. I know plenty of colleagues with a PhD who work as product-line engineers. Lifetime earnings for a PhD also far exceed those without one. Also, there are more opportunities to get into C-level positions. Again, stop posting and spreading your bad info to others.
Feb
16
comment Career advice: PhD in theory of programming languages
Someone with a CS PhD commonly make 10K-20K/year more than someone with a BS/MS. There are plenty of PhDs working as software engineers at Google, Microsoft, Adobe, Oracle, etc. Get your facts straight and enjoy earning less.
Feb
14
comment Why are SW engineering interviews disproportionately difficult (vs. research interviews)?
@ Ethel: If you look on glassdoor.com, where people post their salaries anonymously, you can see that a researcher position pays about $10K to $20K/year more than a comparable SW engineer (same location, same field). Anecdotally, I know my salary is about $25K/year more than my other friends who graduated with a CS M.S. degree from my grad school at about the same time. And it's not just the salary; I've seen that PhDs have higher career trajectories than those without. I do not have direct evidence, but I've seen that PhDs are more easily hired into CTO/VP levels.
Feb
11
comment If we can do functional programming with Python, do we need a specific functional programming language?
This is a stupid question. Close it.