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seen Oct 17 at 21:21

Jan
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
18
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Nov
23
awarded  Yearling
Jun
16
awarded  Good Question
Apr
24
comment How to make the transition to functional programming?
@mwilson: There's an accompanying Real World Functional Programming series online.
Apr
24
answered How to make the transition to functional programming?
Mar
19
revised What is the name of this tree?
added 6 characters in body
Mar
19
comment What is the name of this tree?
So you would just call it a "tree"?
Mar
19
comment What is the name of this tree?
@RobertHarvey: It says the root is the empty string. Not so in my case. I see some other minor differences in the Wikipedia article, but it's probably similar enough to be--as you stated--a form of trie.
Mar
19
comment What is the name of this tree?
Does a trie require a common root?
Mar
19
asked What is the name of this tree?
Feb
17
comment Parser combinator that looks like BNF
Is the syntax BNF-like, or can the same BNF grammar be represented similarly as a parser combinator? That's an important distinction, I think.
Feb
16
comment Parser combinator that looks like BNF
@RobertHarvey: That's what I'm asking: why aren't parser combinators built this way? If the answer is "because it's hard" I'd like to know why.
Feb
16
comment Parser combinator that looks like BNF
@RobertHarvey: None. I'm just curious.
Feb
16
comment Parser combinator that looks like BNF
I haven't looked at Boost Spirit or AntlrWorks. Do they fit what I'm describing? I guess my question is: since BNF is more declarative and easier to read, if it's easy to make a parser combinator look like BNF, why don't more of them?
Feb
16
comment Parser combinator that looks like BNF
Yes, you could argue they look similar, but can equivalent parsers look the same in BNF and Parsec? I've yet to see a non-trivial example of such a thing.
Feb
16
asked Parser combinator that looks like BNF
Feb
7
comment Regulation of the software industry
@EricLippert: What, in your mind, would need to change so that software development is consistently approached as an engineering discipline and less as a craft? (I'd love to hear your thoughts on this, perhaps on your blog.)
Dec
13
comment Collection providing lookup by one of several keys
Is the collection I'm describing unusual, or are those names typical, yet ambiguous because they could refer to a map with compound keys, or multiple discrete keys?
Dec
13
comment Collection providing lookup by one of several keys
That multi-key dictionary is the same as Java's MultiMap. Again, it's different than what I'm describing. Your proposed solution requires the multiple keys to be of the same type, a restriction I'd rather not impose on this data structure. You would be able to access item X through key "foo" or key 42.