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visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen Mar 31 at 12:41

Feb
19
comment Who should write the test plan?
Good up till the last sentence, but testing should never stick merely to checking the application follows expectations (but should also cover the unexpected!), and knowing at least a bit about how the application was technically designed ALWAYS helps me as a tester to identify the cracks I can get my tester crowbar into to lever the thing wide open. ;) It's a bit of an old-fashioned notion to imagine that testers are better not knowing anything about the implementation.
Feb
19
comment Who should write the test plan?
If you're moving towards Agile, try to hire some people who specialise in testing into your current development team. (Note: read up on the different schools of testing first, some are not compatible with an Agile approach - redcanary.mypublicsquare.com/view/hiring-software )
Feb
15
comment Are there any unions for software developers?
It is worth pointing out that in the UK for instance, the time you spend as a union member has NO effect on whether you get a role. The restrictions this answer discusses just aren't relevant to the way unions work here.
Feb
14
comment Should programmers help testers in designing tests?
This is such a strange idea. My mind is plenty polluted already - I'm a tester, by definition I'm a nosy type who pokes around looking at everything. I've never met a dev who could "pollute" my mind just by talking about their own test ideas - test ideas spawn more test ideas in my experience. And knowing what your prejudices and blind spots are can be very useful.
Feb
14
comment Do you count a Masters in CS as a negative?
Yes, good point - I'd completely forgotten about those.
Feb
13
comment Should testers automate their work?
Record & play rightly has a fairly poor reputation. It tends to be pretty fragile, and hard to maintain. Yes, as a quick & dirty "I have to run this on 4 different datacentres, I don't want to keep it for future use", it's fine, but it's horrible to maintain because you end up with tons of repetition. One small element changes - and suddenly you have to update 100 tests. Painful. It also in no way replaces the manual test, which tends to be designed with the assumption that a human will notice all those other things you didn't explicitly check.
Feb
13
comment What are your experiences with off-shore or outsourced testing?
I'm not sure it's that much better than nothing - have you factored in the cost of the time you're going to take to support this remote team with questions, chasing up progress reports to painfully extract the real answer, etc - you probably need to figure one full-time person as liason, plus significant time from your senior technical people to deal with all the issues your full-time liason can't answer. It's also harder dealing with the output of untrained temps, and they'll never get better because there's no incentive for the other company to to keep churn down.
Feb
12
comment What is the role of QA in a BDD-driven project?
+1 for 100% coverage is not the same as 100% tested.
Feb
12
comment Onsite Interview : QA Engineer with more Emphasis on Java Skills
A word of caution - as a tester, I find Stack Exchange contains a lot of highly voted up nonsense. There is good stuff, but it's rare. I don't think SE or SO have enough of a critical mass of testers to overcome the "ignorant and totally unaware of it" voting population. It's a pity the test-focused SE proposal isn't getting more traction.
Feb
12
comment What are good requirements for a QA engineer?
+1 Great answer - especially including a test audition. Some folk sound great when they're talking, but the only way to really evaluate a tester is to actually get them to test.
Feb
12
comment What are good requirements for a QA engineer?
That says rather a lot more about the kind of companies you've worked for than it does about testers in general. As Ethel says, you get what you expect - if you expect your testers to be mundane and pay accordingly, you simply won't attract really skilled testers.
Feb
12
comment Onsite Interview : QA Engineer with more Emphasis on Java Skills
+1 Great answer. I really like the idea of "framing" the interview in that way, and realised reading your answer that's actually how I've thought of all the successful interviews I've had: "cool, here's a chance to chat to nice new people about stuff we're both interested in".
Feb
3
comment Can you recommend a good test plan template?
Excellent - glad it was helpful. For brainstorming, have you thought about using mindmaps? This Lisa Crispin blog post describes how they used mindmapping for theme planning: lisacrispin.com/wordpress/tag/mind-maps
Feb
1
comment What quantitative metrics do you use to measure the quality of an offshore testing team?
I agree absolutely that it doesn't make sense to say bug fixes generally introduce a lot more bugs - and some of that >10% was likely just revealed by the fix, not introduced. However, I was responding to Jim's outlined scenario of code delivered that doesn't even run - in that case, yes, something is very wrong with that development process. I wouldn't expect those teams to be doing a great or even adequate job of bug fixing, as whatever caused the original problem is likely to apply just as much to the bug fixing. Sorry if that wasn't clearer in my original comment.
Jan
30
comment Where can I find statistics / figures on how long testing should / could take?
Then that's really a different question to the one you originally asked.
Jan
30
comment What quantitative metrics do you use to measure the quality of an offshore testing team?
Jim +1 for time given to test. It's a classic problem in a waterfall environment - test comes at the end, and always gets squeezed. To my mind, if you're 75% of the way through testing time before you get code that actually runs - this should be a huge red flag for the project manager that either the programmers did not get enough time to develop the product, or they did such a bad job that attempting to patch up the mess will only get you so far.
Jan
30
comment What quantitative metrics do you use to measure the quality of an offshore testing team?
Unfortunately, testers don't put the bugs in. They only find them. If the system is chock-full of bugs in the first place (and being fixed, cack-handedly by the same folks who created the original bugs, then your testing team will look bad by this metric, no matter how good they are, as each bug they report and get fixed will introduce several more.
Dec
10
comment What mistakes do your users make, and how can you update your application to handle them?
+1 for users "learn your software through exploration".
Dec
5
comment Do you believe it's a good idea for Software Engineers to have to work as Quality Assurance Engineers for some period of time?
Er, that assumes you're working in a place that pays skilled QA folk less than devs. I know some places do, but it doesn't reflect my experience - when I've known people's salaries they've generally been on a par.
Nov
30
comment How To Know When To Stop Testing?
I think you'd find Michael Bolton's blog post about stopping heuristics for testing useful to read: http://www.developsense.com/blog/2009/09/when-do-we-stop-test/ You may recognise some of the heuristics people have suggested in this thread.