5,588 reputation
32552
bio website
location Redmond, WA
age 24
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Nov 18 at 22:19

Credit for Avatar image: http://www.assaultandroidcactus.com/

I'm a Microsoft Software Development Engineer on the Trustworthy Computing Team. I've worked at several security related places previously, including Malware Bytes and PreEmptive Solutions.

On StackOverflow I mostly answer related questions, though I occasionally forray into and a couple of others.

I am the author of pevFind, a component of the ComboFix malware removal tool, and volunteer at BleepingComputer.com as a malware response instructor. My Twitter account is @MalwareMinigun.


Oct
12
comment Stuff every programmer needs while working
I don't think response time should matter for programming -- you're not playing games on a programming system, and that's about all response time buys you. Color reproduction and viewing angle are much more important...
Oct
12
comment Stuff every programmer needs while working
Depends on the fixture too. For example, florescent in one of those "Mirrored Squares" (i.e. hitecsystems.co.uk/lights1.JPG ) fixtures is fine....
Oct
2
comment Use of pirated/cracked software for development
@user1525: Really though, Photoshop is many many times better than any of those tools.
Oct
2
comment What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
HA HA HA HA HA HAAA HA +1 :)
Oct
2
comment What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
Agree about difference from assembly line work -- but in many ways I don't think it's much different from building a house.
Oct
1
comment What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
@Anna + @Solkun: Ah -- I see. I can't comment on the difference between those two, but I do think when looking at new programmers there's significant value in seeing that they at least took some effort to better themselves, whether that's college/university/whatever. It's not so much that I think they'd be inferior programmers -- more so that going to any school is a sign of giving a f*** about your career. If you don't go to school, you know that is not going to bode well for you in the job market. A "I don't care" attitude toward that is a red flag no matter what profession you're in.
Oct
1
comment What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
@Slokun: What's the difference between "college" and "university" in the above context? As far as I knew they were the same...
Sep
30
comment What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
+1 -- true. That said, porting to ideomatic C++ probably will make it run faster (but is by no means automatic)
Sep
30
comment What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
Hmm.... not entirely sure I think this is a myth. It's not because you learn too much about "real programming" in a university -- it's more about the kind of person who goes to a university versus one who does not. The degree doesn't tell you they learned too much, but it does increase the chances of the person you picked giving a shit. Of course that matters less the more experience the individual you are working with has.
Sep
26
comment int* i; or int *i; or int * i;
@Tamás Szelei: The difference really doesn't matter to someone using the language -- but if you're trying to explain something in terms of the language used in the standard, it can cause confusion.
Sep
26
comment int* i; or int *i; or int * i;
The problem with this is that the type is not a "pointer to an int". C (and C++) doesn't have a pointer type. It is a pointer to a block of memory, of which is type int.
Sep
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
18
comment Do dynamic typed languages deserve all the criticism?
"It's free, YOU work on it!" <-- Biggest problem with F/OSS in general, I'd +1 but I'm out of votes :(
Sep
18
comment Do dynamic typed languages deserve all the criticism?
@Frank: I have used that kind of language, and most of the time the result has been unmaintainable mess. (To be fair, it was PHP, and PHP has other problems besides dynamic typing)
Sep
18
comment What syntax element do you hate most in a programming language you use frequently?
@Mason: What about cases like shared_ptr, where -> accesses the contained type and . accesses properties of the shared_ptr itself? I'm sorry, but I completely disagree here.
Sep
18
comment What syntax element do you hate most in a programming language you use frequently?
Or, just use typedefs and there's no confusion.
Sep
18
awarded  Student
Sep
18
comment What syntax element do you hate most in a programming language you use frequently?
Hmm.. this depends. For "Abort Ifs" which merely check a condition and return an error code (or throw an exception), I'd much rather not see the braces.
Sep
18
comment What syntax element do you hate most in a programming language you use frequently?
I'm confused -- do you mean the portion in the parenthesis (val bar and so on) or the portion in curly braces (the part following extends Model)? (There are no brackets in that code)
Sep
18
comment What syntax element do you hate most in a programming language you use frequently?
@greyfade: Any code using duff's device in C needs to die a horrible death. Compilers make better decisions about these kinds of things than you do.