4,603 reputation
1537
bio website linkedin.com/in/ethelevans
location Seattle, WA
age 31
visits member for 4 years, 5 months
seen Apr 15 at 18:27

SDET with 5 years of experience in software testing & BS in Computer Science. I'm also not very good at filling out "About Me" sections. I'm not as much of an expert as I'd like to be, so am trying to soak up knowledge as fast as I can while balancing work and "real life".


Mar
17
comment Why do ads for s/w engineers always say they “offer a fast-paced environment”?
Boring code and products are good, agreed. I think we're disagreeing about what "fast-paced" means in a work-environment. I think fast-paced means delivering business value quickly and consistently. I think people get confused and think it means working hard and being stressed, always being in emergency mode, etc. These things slow down the pace of releasing business value, however, and therefore are truly symptoms of a slow-paced work environment. I fixed my answer up to better explain my point-of-view on this.
Mar
17
comment Why do ads for s/w engineers always say they “offer a fast-paced environment”?
Is it wrong? I generally don't pick up new skills and grow my abilities doing boring work, and top talent generally still wants to grow. If that top talent wants work-life balance, it's even more important to be able to grow on the job and not only in their free time. On the other hand, people can often mix up "non-stop emergencies" with "interesting work". IME, emergencies are very boring and just get in the way of the interesting work offered by a real fast-paced environment.
Mar
11
comment Most underestimated programming tool
I do this all the time with my husband. As a tech support guy with just a smattering of programming ability, he understands about 60% of what I say but forces me to explain the 40% that I don't understand as well. The number of occasions where it works is really quite impressive.
Mar
10
comment How does a CS student negotiate in/after a job interview?
@Billy, don't worry too much about being suckered by MS. They have clear rules for how much they pay; you will fall into a tier, and that tier will have a range that you can earn. MS pays about 65th percentile compared to other software companies - a little better than normal - and also has great benefits (100% of health care expenses covered, etc.). Do negotiate politely - if you can get it, even a small difference in income at the beginning of your career will have a big impact down the line. Source: Personal experience including 1 year employed full-time at MS.
Mar
10
comment Not getting paid for hours you've worked?
@Mercfh - I actually still get paid pretty well. Skill is more important for getting a high paycheck than the willingness to work long hours, IME. Look at it this way: If a company isn't smart enough to avoid constantly overworking their devs, they probably aren't smart enough to pay well to get the top talent. And, the top talent wouldn't stay; the top talent already has all the money they need, and doesn't need to work with a bunch of exhausted, stressed-out coworkers.
Mar
7
comment How important is it to learn jQuery with ASP.NET
If you are having trouble with JQuery, getting a better understanding of client-side coding and how AJAX works (without forms) might help. I also found JQuery boring with ASP .NET, because the WinForms covers up a lot of what happens with AJAX and client-side stuff. When I transitioned to ASP .NET MVC, however, I found that all that client-side stuff wasn't covered up anymore, and JQuery became both more useful and more interesting.
Mar
7
comment How important is it to learn jQuery with ASP.NET
+1 - I just went through the learning curve of moving from ASP .NET to ASP .NET MVC 2. For server-side code, it's an easy transition. For client-side / AJAX stuff, it's a very difficult transition. A much better understanding of how AJAX works and what it is is needed. Learning a little JQuery was a very important part of that transition, for me.
Mar
7
comment How to share code as open source?
@Geoffrey, I might not post it for a little while (a month or two). I think I need to get it into a better, more readable / better tested state first. Right now, it's not really ready for collaboration - no comments or documentation, few unit tests.
Mar
7
comment How to share code as open source?
@Jeremy - I intended to accept your updated answer, but someone else posted something that better matches what I'm looking for. Thank you anyways for the update - it's a good answer (+1), just not quite what I was trying to get.
Mar
7
comment How to share code as open source?
@Jeremy, could you add these details to your answer below? I realize it's mostly common sense, but it's helpful for those like me who are worried that there might be other, less common-sense conventions to worry about. Putting one's first open source project out in public can be a little scary.
Mar
4
comment How to share code as open source?
thanks. I'm kind of looking for more than what I "technically" need to do. What are normal / best practices for putting a project up as open source?
Mar
4
comment How to share code as open source?
Okay, I guess that's more what I'm trying to figure out. What do people expect from open source projects before release? It sounds like I can just throw it out there for now, to share w/ the initial users and a few people who have expressed interest - but then I will need to bring it up to speed later if I want to encourage others on the WWW to use it / further develop it?
Mar
3
comment How to share code as open source?
The answers seems to be saying that there are no "gotchas" or conventions to worry about - it's just grab a license, put it with the code, and distribute? And it doesn't matter that it's not thoroughly tested, code-reviewed, documented, or anything else, I won't look stupid? Or am I reading into answers here?
Mar
3
comment How to share code as open source?
I'm having trouble navigating the FSF site. After about 10 minutes of trying to find what I'm looking for, I'm starting to get a bit of a headache from what is starting to feel like one long sales pitch. Can you direct me to some specific resources on that site that will help me actually get open source software released, and not just tell me why I should support free software or why everything else is bad?
Mar
2
comment What do you do when you realize your job requires you to do something out of your depth?
+1. Insisting on more time is the space between giving up and overdoing work. Your career is like a marathon, not a sprint. You need to find a pace for learning that you can maintain long-term, and choose carefully when you will invest more effort to make a push to get ahead of the crowd.
Mar
2
comment What do you do when you realize your job requires you to do something out of your depth?
Isn't there a middle ground involving good communication and a slower pace? His employer chose to hire him, knowing his skill level was lower. Presumably, he was not being paid a ton to learn quickly. His health was being impacted. Saying, "This amount of work is unreasonable for my skill level in the given time frame. I can do it, but it will take twice as long because of the learning curve," is a valid third option that merits consideration.
Mar
2
comment How do you keep your basic skills from atrophy?
My personal coding time is always highly interrupted (3 kids at home). The linked page states, "You need time without interruptions". Is this actually a need, or will I still be able to learn pretty effectively if I am frequently interrupted?
Mar
1
comment Computer Science or Computer Engineering for Data Science and Machine Learning
+1 for suggesting Master's degree
Feb
28
comment How would most programmers feel about the bugs they wrote?
As an SDET, my favorite compliment from devs is "Good find!" Devs are often pretty chipper about bugs being found.
Feb
24
comment What is your advice for a new recruiter?
Very true. If a developer already knows multiple languages and technologies, adding another to their repertoire (enough to use, that is; not expertise) is a matter of days or even merely hours, NOT weeks, provided they are given a good reference book / website and the paradigms of the languages are not exceedingly different. Expertise takes years, but adequacy is usually sufficient for a temp and takes very little time for a skilled programmer. Identifying truly skilled programmers might be difficult for a non-techie, though . . .