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visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Sep 17 at 14:29

Aug
17
comment Do you sign each of your source files with your name?
@scorchio: I don't send repos to people. I send finished, deployable code.
Aug
17
comment Do you sign each of your source files with your name?
@scorchio: Did you even read what I wrote? The vast majority of people who use my code don't have access to my VCS, so how would that help them?
Aug
17
answered Do you sign each of your source files with your name?
Aug
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
5
answered Responding to interview questions involving unknown algorithms
Aug
4
answered Design flaws and dealing with humiliation from it
Aug
4
comment Submit code during interview
I like that answer. If it's specific to their database, what else are you going to do with it? Write it off as the price for interviewing. Also, chances are you're not going to be blowing their minds with your brilliance...Not being mean, but I know enough of that sort of people to know that they never look for jobs, or interview.
Jul
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
28
comment Where do you use ROT13?
@graham: Yea, I didn't want to go there. I thought about saying the "English" alphabet, which would make sense, but is kinda anglocentric.
Jul
28
revised Where do you use ROT13?
added 39 characters in body
Jul
28
comment Where do you use ROT13?
@green Ell. Oh. Ell. 13 is ROTing my brain.
Jul
28
answered Where do you use ROT13?
Jul
19
comment How do you keep all those languages straight in your head
+1 for not being all, "Well if you're a real programmer, you won't have any problems." If you program in enough different languages, syntax references are a must.
Jul
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
18
comment When is code “legacy”?
@jerry: So what made it legacy? Legacy isn't a synonym for "bad".
Jul
18
answered When is code “legacy”?
Jul
18
comment When is code “legacy”?
I agree with this answer most. Legacy is more about being stuck on an obsolete platform than being annoying (yet modern) code that you don't want to support. Legacy code is often quite good (otherwise no one would care if you left it behind!) but it's usually wedded to obsolescent hardware and antiquated languages/libraries/databases/etc.
Jul
18
answered When did developers start making normalized relational databases?
Jul
15
answered EAV - is it really bad in all scenarios?
Jul
14
awarded  Enlightened