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visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen 22 hours ago

Jul
18
answered When is code “legacy”?
Jul
18
comment When is code “legacy”?
I agree with this answer most. Legacy is more about being stuck on an obsolete platform than being annoying (yet modern) code that you don't want to support. Legacy code is often quite good (otherwise no one would care if you left it behind!) but it's usually wedded to obsolescent hardware and antiquated languages/libraries/databases/etc.
Jul
18
answered When did developers start making normalized relational databases?
Jul
15
answered EAV - is it really bad in all scenarios?
Jul
14
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
13
answered Is there an open source license for this?
Jul
13
comment Revenue sharing with customer who is unable to pay development fee
@maple: Agreed. For 50% I would expect the other person to have done just an extraordinary job of planning the app, and also to have some non-technical skill to contribute (art or writing or sound or something)
Jul
13
answered Is it worth developing custom shopping cart?
Jul
13
answered Revenue sharing with customer who is unable to pay development fee
Jul
13
answered Use of Apache 2.0 Licensed K9 Email Android App in Commercial Email App
Jul
6
comment I'm forced to write bad code. How do I save my face?
@ashamed: Sometimes it's more important to have it quick than to have it good. (siryes.blogspot.com/2010/11/…)
Jun
30
comment Is it a bad idea to list every function/method argument on a new line and why?
Too many people reduce arguments by dumping them in an array. I'd rather see an ugly mess than cleaner-looking code with hidden complexity.
Jun
29
comment Changing jobs and leaving a project without a leader (aka, me)
Show them the exact loyalty they'd show you. No, I take that back. A professional should never crap on his bosses desk.
Jun
29
comment Be a better programmer or an irreplacable employee?
I've made a career of wandering through the code left behind by "irreplaceable" people, and the surprising thing is how sloppy they tend to be. Generally the only real barrier to fixing their mess is time. And the little bottlenecks they put in to make themselves "irreplaceable" are usually pretty simple: they're lazy, remember? So it's usually not much work to take that stuff out, and then you can fix the rest at your leisure.
Jun
29
comment Be a better programmer or an irreplacable employee?
Everyone is replaceable. If you think you're not, you're lying to yourself.
Jun
29
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
29
comment What is the proper response to lousy error message?
Heh. When I started working where I am now, I was amazed that the code was so bad. Now I'm amazed that it is as good as it was. If you have to go from the recognized need for an application to production in a week or less, clean and pretty isn't as important as functional.
Jun
23
answered Move on and look elsewhere, or confront the boss?
Jun
22
awarded  Nice Answer