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Feb
10
comment Why Java is a factor 2-3 slower than equivalent C++ program?
@InstructedA: I guess in the end, I'm not sure if the insight you saw was in the answer or a comment. I've already commented on the lack of insight in the answer. I don't see much in most of the comments either--I think my comment was mostly stating what should have been obvious.
Feb
10
comment Why Java is a factor 2-3 slower than equivalent C++ program?
@Snowman: It produces casts, yes. That doesn't mean it all happens at compile time though (or are you actually unaware that Java casts can produce run-time errors?)
Feb
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
10
comment Why Java is a factor 2-3 slower than equivalent C++ program?
@InstructedA: Sorry, but I don't see much in the way of deep insight here. It seems to say that the only factor worth considering in tool choice is your team's current familiarity. If you already have a large team, that may be a major factor--but it's still not the sole factor to consider. When you don't have a large existing team, it may not be a factor at all.
Feb
10
comment Why Java is a factor 2-3 slower than equivalent C++ program?
This is a "flawed measurement" only to the extent that it's a poor reflection of the workload at hand. Using a short-lived program would be flawed if you really care about long-running server processes. Using a long-running program would be equally flawed if you really care about small utilities that you only expect to run for a short time.
Feb
10
answered Why Java is a factor 2-3 slower than equivalent C++ program?
Jan
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
27
revised Is the 'finally' portion of a 'try … catch … finally' construct even necessary?
added 157 characters in body
Jan
27
revised Is the 'finally' portion of a 'try … catch … finally' construct even necessary?
added 157 characters in body
Jan
27
answered Is the 'finally' portion of a 'try … catch … finally' construct even necessary?
Jan
19
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
19
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
16
comment What is the history of why bytes are eight bits?
@Pacerier: Feel free. I'm not going to sign up for a site I don't care about just to correct them on a subject that doesn't matter much anyway.
Sep
15
comment What is the history of why bytes are eight bits?
@Pacerier: Unfortunate, some of the information there is just plain wrong (e.g., it says the PDP-10 was a 32-bit machine, but it was actually a 36-bit machine).
Sep
10
revised How to avoid redundant code in designing inheritance in C++
added 905 characters in body
Sep
10
answered How to avoid redundant code in designing inheritance in C++
Sep
10
comment How to abide the “allocate in caller” rule when the size is computed in the callee?
This looks to me like it applies almost exclusively to C, not C++. In C++, instead of handle_init, handle_do and handle_free, you almost certainly want an object with init handled in the ctor, free handled in the dtor, and do handled in a member function--possibly but not necessarily an operator(). Allocation probably should be internal to the object, likely via a std::unique_ptr or some other smart pointer type.