3,195 reputation
1117
bio website jelv.is
location Berkeley, CA
age 22
visits member for 4 years, 5 months
seen 2 days ago

I am a software engineer primarily interested in programming languages, functional programming, program synthesis, type theory, universal algebra and startups (not necessarily in that order!). In the near future, I want to combine as many of these as possible.

Right now I'm an engineer at Esper, an early stage startup in Palo Alto. We use OCaml on the backend, which is pretty neat.

I am always happy to chat: my email is tikhon@jelv.is.

I am especially interested in questions and projects involving Haskell or interesting PL issues.

GitHub: http://github.com/TikhonJelvis

Website: http://jelv.is


May
6
revised What is the “Free Monad + Interpreter” pattern?
added 57 characters in body
May
6
comment What is the “Free Monad + Interpreter” pattern?
@AndrewThaddeusMartin: Yeah, that sounds like the best solution.
May
5
comment What is the “Free Monad + Interpreter” pattern?
@AndrewThaddeusMartin: Actually, thinking about it, I'm not sure a Return case makes sense. The only way to produce a Free DSL a with Return is Return undefined, so it would be partial no matter what. I'd have to think a bit more about what that case should actually be.
May
5
comment What is the “Free Monad + Interpreter” pattern?
@AndrewThaddeusMartin: Ah, fair point. I'll add that case in.
Apr
6
comment What is the “Free Monad + Interpreter” pattern?
@BenjaminHodgson: It makes the pattern more explicit, allows us to write reusable code and makes reasoning about it simpler. (In a sense, we can reuse reasoning just like we can reuse code!) Your intuition that it's just a matter of factoring the recursion out is correct, and it's useful just like any other sort of factoring with the added benefit of being mathematically grounded. The free package has some useful functions, for example.
Mar
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
3
awarded  Yearling
Nov
7
comment What is the logic behind the use of different arrows (-> <-) in Haskell?
@Carcigenicate: Actually, you can think of list comprehensions as just a different syntax for do-notation. In fact, they used to be "monad comprehensions" by default, and now you can still enable that functionality with an extension: Monad Comprehensions.
Aug
26
comment Are null references really a bad thing?
@greenoldman: You would have some way to pattern match on the Maybe<A> value (ie do this when it has a value and that when it's null). Most languages can include this in a library with first-class functions and lambdas, and many languages have specific constructs for pattern-matching like this (ie switch on steroids).
Aug
19
awarded  Suffrage
Jul
20
comment Does javascript support numerically indexed arrays with a more optimized algorithm than an associative array?
@supercat: I'm not entirely sure exactly how slice is defined in the standard, but I suspect you're right in that it has to work with all the whole-number keys. Perhaps it also depends on the length property of the array.
Jul
20
comment Does javascript support numerically indexed arrays with a more optimized algorithm than an associative array?
@supercat: That depends on which JavaScript implementation you use. It's not part of the standard, so you can't necessarily rely on it. It's probably true for most browsers at the moment, but they might change it in the future—after all, they changed to this implementation from just returning every key in the order it was added recently, I believe.
Jun
18
comment Why are most functional programming languages also interpreted languages?
@JörgWMittag: Ah, so mixed mode is basically JIT.
Jun
18
comment Why are most functional programming languages also interpreted languages?
@JörgWMittag: Well, you have to compile to the bytecode first. Perhaps I misunderstood what you meant by mixed-mode though. The bytecode compiler is used by camlp4, but that's a bit of a historical accident and makes it slow, so they're not using it for their new "extension point" system. Mostly, the bytecode compiler is useful for portability and simplicity: for example, it's used by js_of_ocaml to compile to JavaScript. I think it's also used for the REPL.
Jun
18
comment Dealing with state problems in functional programming
Except perhaps for the database example, those problems are not inherently stateful. For example, for GUI programming, you're really using mutable state as a poor, implicit model of time; functional reactive programming lets you model time explicitly without relying on state by providing streams of events you can combine.
Jun
18
comment Why are most functional programming languages also interpreted languages?
OCaml has something like two implementations in one: a normal compiler and a bytecode compiler. The first is a normal optimizing compiler while the second is more a mixed-mode system with a bytecode interpreter. They're shipped together, but are separate backends.
Jun
4
awarded  Guru
Jun
4
revised What is the “Free Monad + Interpreter” pattern?
deleted 1 character in body
Jun
3
awarded  Mortarboard
Jun
3
awarded  Good Answer