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visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Sep 16 '13 at 22:05

no blog, no github yet.


May
9
comment When are chained assignments (i.e. a=b=c) bad form?
Having small functions, one could also throw an exception when something bad happens and have the caller decide whether the function should be called again or not - makes it easier to do a limited number of retries.
May
8
comment When are chained assignments (i.e. a=b=c) bad form?
Specifically in the context of Winforms - if you have just two buttons/controls, then write out two lines. If you have a bunch of them, then perhaps save the logical groups of them in a set, and then apply an attribute change to the whole set with aid of a helper function. Still, as Robert said, try to minimize state! Frankly, try to simplify the UI first. You can also logically separate controls by groupboxes, or give them a specific Tag, and then can change all controls in a given GroupBox with tag = "foo" to have .Enabled = someCondition. Speed will matter less than clarity.
May
8
comment When are chained assignments (i.e. a=b=c) bad form?
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/5590392/…
May
1
comment Pairwise testing, not possible to say which combinations is faulty?
Do you think this is applicable to performance testing? If P(A, B, C) is my "performance function" - e.g. how much RAM / CPU it took to to execute a function with given parameters A, B and C, then would having this result help interpolate the answer for any possible combination of A, B and C?
Apr
26
comment To open source or sell? How to choose? How to proceed?
@Steve Evers, funny to hear that from a MSFT employee ;)
Apr
26
comment To open source or sell? How to choose? How to proceed?
+1 I donated as much as 50 euro to free software projects, but I do not remember ever paying for software with an official price tag, no matter how little it costs. If I have to pay upfront, I will either find a cracked version (even if it takes an hour of my time, an hour that would have earned me a higher amount) or will not use it at all. Being able to donate any amount or not donate at all feels like I am feeding a starving developer. Paying a fixed price feels like maximizing someone's bottom line. Perhaps not rational thinking, but this bias is very strong in me - a primitive instinct.
Apr
26
comment To open source or sell? How to choose? How to proceed?
@Victor is right though. Many developers produce money-making products where they have to remember that "We are not our target audience". I did not see the point of Facebook or Twitter or Instagram, so I could not imagine their earning potential, neither did I care, neither do I now. I believe that programmers, being a special cast of humans, should try to work on important things like ending corruption, wars, cancer, HIV rather than yet another app. I personally would not build a company out of an "mp3 player playlist" bc that would free up my time for something else. Now you have the context
Apr
26
comment To open source or sell? How to choose? How to proceed?
If you post it on github and it takes off, then you can show it off at your next job interview and negotiate a higher salary. Chances are that you will get three orders of magnitude more money that way. Plus, I would not pay for your app ;) (seriously).
Mar
19
comment How can I apply Six Sigma in a software development environment?
crosstalkonline.org/storage/issue-archives/2006/200604/…
Mar
19
comment How can I apply Six Sigma in a software development environment?
It's not that six sigma is great; it's that the manager who let his employees design circuits from scratch should have been fired.
Mar
19
comment How can I apply Six Sigma in a software development environment?
I had to take the first six sigma training and while my company paid for it, I wish I could get my time back. The instructor was clueless, the exercises were fun little games but ultimately pointless. Six sigma is about statistics and it is applicable to dumb, repetitive, well defined tasks, the kind of tasks that are often being outsourced to robots. Writing good software is a creative process. Six sigma helps good software engineers just as much as Calculus lectures would help Tom Cruise act. Just the fact that you asked this question disqualifies you from working with me or my colleagues.
Mar
15
comment Fast algorithm for finding common elements of two sorted lists
@Chewy Gumball, duh, thanks, changed to O(n).
Mar
15
revised Fast algorithm for finding common elements of two sorted lists
edited body
Mar
14
revised Fast algorithm for finding common elements of two sorted lists
added 42 characters in body
Mar
14
answered Fast algorithm for finding common elements of two sorted lists
Mar
14
comment Fast algorithm for finding common elements of two sorted lists
You can do it in O(n) without using hash tables, sets or any other data structures that are not simple arrays or linked lists. The fact that the lists are sorted helps you - inside of a while loop (not for loop) you would move a pointer to left list and a right list conditionally. The exact details can be somewhat messy, but because both lists are sorted, you only need to traverse each one once, going in one direction only. In fact, you do not need to be able to access them by index at all. The step is similar to a merge step of the merge sort algorithm.
Mar
4
comment What is the functional-programming alternative to an interface?
The answer would be language-dependent. In Clojure you can use clojure.org/protocols, where the only soft area is the types of parameters that the functions must operate on - they are an object - that is all you know.
Mar
1
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
26
comment Naming guard clauses that throw exceptions
The tag says C# but I see a Java-style for[each] being used as well as Java-style braces and Java-style method naming conventions.
Feb
19
comment Changing behaviour of abstract class without modifying subclasses
The pattern is called functional programming (as opposed to OOP).