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Feb
8
comment Can a tree be used to create a stack?
A set is not exactly the same as an array except without duplicates. An array is indexed in order, while a set is explicitly unordered.
Feb
7
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
7
awarded  Populist
Feb
7
comment Encrypted content in games
@immibis The thing is, you can't assume that. Somewhere in the world, someone is going to have the ability to crack it, and when it's cracked once and posted on the Web, it's cracked world-wide.
Feb
6
comment Encrypted content in games
@JonasDralle That's a disgustingly cynical viewpoint, and it's also not true. The strong, enduring community that got built up around Morrowind and Oblivion didn't prevent Skyrim from selling; if anything, it made it more successful!
Feb
6
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
6
answered Encrypted content in games
Feb
1
comment Help in understanding computer science, programming and abstraction
@recursivePointer Was it the same algorithm, or did they just have a really ugly version in Java and a much clearer implementation in the Lisp one?
Feb
1
comment Help in understanding computer science, programming and abstraction
The problem with SICP is that, while it opens with the eminently sensible remark that computer programs should be written for people to read and understand as a higher priority than for a computer to execute, it then goes on to actually give a book full of example code in Lisp, one of the most ridiculously difficult-to-read languages ever invented. (Which was set up that way because the science of parsing--the formal theory involved in making text understandable to a machine--was in its infancy when Lisp was developed, so they sacrificed readability in favor of ultra-simple parsing.)
Jan
30
answered Prevent my clients from giving or selling my software using a LGPLv3 library to others
Jan
29
comment in dynamic language like javascript how do you know what the argument is?
How else is it possible to instantiate it, given the restrictions you set in your example? (Assuming Java or C#, with the way you wrote the sample code.) If there are no public constructors, then nothing but a static member of the class or its descendants are in-scope to call the constructor, and if it's a final class, there are no descendants.
Jan
28
answered in dynamic language like javascript how do you know what the argument is?
Jan
28
comment in dynamic language like javascript how do you know what the argument is?
Meh. If something is a final class with no public constructors, you won't have much searching to do; the answer to how to instantiate it will obviously be on a static method within the class itself. The one you want will almost certainly have a return value of type Configuration. (And if not it will have a ref/out parameter of that type, or accept a list or other collection to put the new value in, but those are weird, uncommon cases; usually it'll be the return value.) Having declared types helps you easily narrow it down like that.
Jan
25
comment Should we avoid language features that C++ has but Java doesn't to increase maintainability?
"If you want code that's easy to understand and parse, go with LISP or whatever." I wouldn't agree with that. Lisp is trivial to parse, but precisely because of this--because it was created in a time when the knowledge of parsers and the principles behind building them effectively was still in its infancy, and so they punted and went with the most ridiculously simplistic thing that could possibly work--you don't get a lot of the syntactic benefits of modern languages. So it's easy to parse, but not at all easy to understand. There's a reason people call it "Lost In Superfluous Parentheses."
Jan
25
comment in dynamic language like javascript how do you know what the argument is?
You don't. That's the problem.
Jan
24
revised Trying to understand P vs NP vs NP Complete vs NP Hard
deleted 9 characters in body
Jan
23
comment Why does integer division result in an integer?
@JerryCoffin Yes, it should be obvious, from my comments elsewhere in this question, that I'm quite aware of div and what it does.
Jan
22
awarded  Nice Question