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Apr
18
comment What about LISP, if anything, makes it easier to implement macro systems?
@ThrowawayAccount3Million: On the contrary, that tutorial illustrates the simplicity of the system, showing how you can use the Visitor Pattern to make a macro in a simple way. You don't "need to know every class and how they fit together"; just the specific types you're dealing with. The visitor defined in the example only needs to know about one AST node type: ReferenceExpression; the class it inherits from takes care of all the rest of the logic of walking the AST. (more)
Apr
18
revised What about LISP, if anything, makes it easier to implement macro systems?
Improving the macro example
Apr
17
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
16
comment Why was the Itanium processor difficult to write a compiler for?
@supercat: I'm not talking about a hypothetical VM, but about a hypothetical IR that would be compiled the rest of the way by an Intel code generator.
Apr
16
asked Why was the Itanium processor difficult to write a compiler for?
Apr
16
comment Pass by value result with exceptions
What language is this? It appears to use C-like syntax, but the "value-result" modifier isn't from anything I'm familiar with.
Apr
15
comment Sharing source code of my online game?
So you made a game 4 years ago that's built up a decent community of players, and now you're wondering about making it more open. First thing I think of is Neverwinter Nights. It came out in 2002, and it still has a strong, active fan community, because they included a comprehensive editor/mod tool set that can turn a non-trivial percentage of players into co-creators who build upon the established foundation of NWN. Releasing the source would be the ultimate expression of this attitude, and would make your community stronger, if less centralized. I say go for it!
Apr
14
awarded  Explainer
Apr
13
comment Why do many exception messages not contain useful details?
Again, there's nothing wrong with letting the user see the entire stack trace, as long as the software is client-side. Every professional software project I've ever worked on, and most of the amateur ones as well, contained a logging system that would generate a full error dump when an unhandled exception was raised, including full stack traces of all currently-running threads in the process. And the user could (gasp, oh horror!) look at it any time he wanted, since that is necessary (not simply useful, but required) in order to send the error message back to us! What is wrong with that?
Apr
13
comment Why do many exception messages not contain useful details?
@Snowman: Yes, that's exactly the point of my original comment.
Apr
13
comment Why do many exception messages not contain useful details?
@Snowman: What's inaccessible to the user if it's client-side software? The owner of the machine owns the machine and can get at anything.
Apr
13
comment Why do many exception messages not contain useful details?
@Telastyn: Only if your system is open to attackers. If you're running a Web server, for example, you want to serve up bland error messages to the end-user, but you still want very detailed error messages to get logged at your end. And on client-side software, where the user is not an attacker, you definitely want those error messages to be as detailed as possible, so that when something goes wrong and you get sent a bug report, you have as much information to work with as possible, because a lot of times that's all you get.
Apr
12
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
11
revised Are first-class continuations useful in modern object-oriented programming languages?
added 8 characters in body
Apr
11
answered Are first-class continuations useful in modern object-oriented programming languages?
Apr
8
comment Language compiled to JS – most elegant way to do synchronous-style waits
synchronously (without blocking the thread, of course) You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means, because synchronously means "blocking the thread".
Apr
8
comment NoSQL within SQL Server
@BlueRaja: Umm... XML databases are slow, particularly compared to relational databases. Since when is that controversial, or an opinion?
Apr
3
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
3
awarded  Nice Answer